The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot is available in a new paperback edition!

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot is available in a new paperback edition!” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/10/12/the-hammock-a-novel-based-on-the-true-story-of-french-painter-james-tissot-is-available-in-a-new-paperback-edition/. <Date viewed.>

Exciting news! The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot is now available as a print book – a paperback edition with an elegant and distinctive cover by the New York-based graphic designer for television and film, Emilie Misset.

THE HAMMOCK: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, portrays ten remarkable years in the life of James Tissot (1836 – 1902), who rebuilt – and then lost – his reputation in London. By 1870, at age 34, he had become a multi-millionaire celebrity with an opulent new Parisian villa and studio among aristocratic neighbors near the Arc de Triomphe. Handsome and charming, his friends included the painters James McNeill Whistler, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, and John Everett Millais. When the Prussians attacked Paris that year, Tissot became a sharpshooter in the artists’ brigade defending the besieged capital. Then, after a bloody Communist rebellion fought virtually at the doorstep of his mansion, he fled to London. By the end of the decade, his pictures had pushed the boundaries of Victorian morality, and the British art establishment turned against him. THE HAMMOCK is a psychological portrait, exploring the forces that unwound the career of this complex man. Based on contemporary sources, the novel brings Tissot’s world alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

You can order the book here: The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot (356 pages; ISBN (paperback): 978-0578735221).

The ebook remains available at the same link and features 17 stunning, full color, high-resolution fine art images courtesy of the Bridgeman Art Library. The interactive images are embedded in the story as it unfolds.

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).  See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

NOTE:  If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter.

Since the ebook was published in 2012, I have blogged regularly for the past eight years on James Tissot’s life and work. Most of his large oil paintings are featured on my blog, and the illustrated Index to Posts can help you find them.

If you enjoy art and historical fiction and would like to escape to the Victorian era during the birth of Impressionism, you’ll enjoy The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot – and please share your review on my page on amazon.com, or at goodreads.com. It’s also a great gift for period drama lovers.

If you’ve read The Hammock and you’d like to learn more about the lives of the artists it portrays, see the Index to Posts on my blog. The posts share the true stories behind Tissot’s life, friends, and times, year by year, from his youth to his pre-war celebrity. Join me as I explore people and events prior to my novel’s opening in October 1870, during the Franco-Prussian War and the Siege of Paris, and other topics related to James Tissot and his art, such as James Tissot’s Model and Muse, Kathleen Newton, A Closer Look at Tissot’s “Hush! (The Concert)”, and Was James Tissot a Plagiarist?

Read worldwide, my blog combines previous scholarship with original research and discussions of Tissot’s work in public collections and at auction.

Author Bio here.

Copyright notice

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

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James Tissot’s “Chrysanthemums” (1877)

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “James Tissot’s “Chrysanthemums” (1877).” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/09/14/james-tissots-chrysanthemums-1877/. <Date viewed.>

Chrysanthemums, yellow, IMG_7215Chrysanthemums, IMG_7222As the weather turns autumnal, the home and garden shops display mums – chrysanthemums. The mums so familiar to us in the fall are hardy but unexciting, just something to add a spot of color to our gardens in place of the daffodils, peonies, irises, lilies, and roses that we’ve enjoyed in earlier months. Mums are, admit it, a bit boring – now. But they have an illustrious history.

Chrysanthemums and Cabbage, Cleveland-1960.40_print, DETAIL

Above: Detail, Chrysanthemums and Cabbage (c. 1486 or before), by Tao Cheng (Chinese, active c. 1471–after 1502). Handscroll, ink and slight color on paper. Cleveland Museum of Art.

Chrysanthemums were cultivated in China as a flowering medicinal herb as early as the fifteenth century B.C. Chinese scholars prized the flowers as a symbol of nobility and integrity, and in traditional Chinese medicine, the “Queen of the East” could ease fever, headache, cough, and dizziness, improve swollen or dry eyes and blurred vision, and inhibit aging and prolong life. Chrysanthemum flowers can be brewed for a rich, flavorful, and refreshing tea.

The chrysanthemum was introduced into Japan in the eighth century A.D., and the Emperor adopted the flower, thought to be refined and elegant, as his official emblem. In English the Imperial Throne of Japan is referred to as the Chrysanthemum Throne. The chrysanthemum has been a traditional motif in Japanese art and poetry.

Chrysanthemums, mid-1600s, Cleveland-1964.159_printChrysanthemums were brought to Europe in the seventeenth century, during the feudal military government of Japan during the Tokugawa shogunate, from 1600 to 1868. During this period, most foreigners were banned. Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan experienced rapid economic growth and urbanization, which led to the rise of a prosperous merchant class and a leisured, pleasure-seeking urban culture, or Ukiyo.

With the signing of the first commercial treaty between Japan and America in 1854, more than two hundred years of Japanese seclusion came to an end.

At the 1862 London International Exhibition, the retired first British Minister to Japan, Sir Rutherford Alcock (1809-1897) showed his collection at his Japanese Pavilion. The exotic Japanese treasures – handcrafted pottery, lacquer, bamboo and ivory – were a sensation.

Left: Chrysanthemums (mid 1600s), by Kitagawa Sōsetsu (Japanese, active 1639-50). Hanging scroll. Cleveland Museum of Art.

Chrysanthemums, nypl.digitalcollections.f06292b0-3729-0135-c871-7bb9f5472344.001.wAbove: Three Yoshiwara women at a chrysanthemum show (1766). Woodcut print. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. The New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Chrysanthemums and horsefly, artsmia-8689

Above: Chrysanthemums and Horsefly (c. 1833-1834), by Katsushika Hokusai. Woodblock print. Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Chrysanthemums and Wren, MET-DP121501One of the most dazzling exhibits at the 1867 Paris International Exposition was the Japanese Pavilion, and it received more visitors than any other exhibit. This was the first World’s Fair in which Japan participated. The Japanese Imperial Commission to the Exposition was led by fourteen-year-old Prince Tokugawa Akitake (1853-1910), a younger brother of the man who would be the last Shogun under Japan’s feudal regime. The delegation arrived in Paris in March 1867, and one year later, James Tissot was appointed gwa-gaku, or drawing master, to Prince Akitake.

Prince Akitake, who called his teacher “Chi-so,” returned to Japan in October 1868. The Tokugawa shogunate was overthrown by loyalists of the Imperial Court in the Meiji Restoration in a coup d’état in January 1868. The restoration of an absolute monarch, the Emperor of Japan, ushered in an era of modernization and industrialization which brought sweeping reforms in government, the military and the culture.

Right: A Wren and Chrysanthemums (c.1830), by Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, Tokyo (Edo) 1797–1858), Woodblock print. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

RISDM 34-305

Above: The everlasting chrysanthemum (Toshigiku), 1843-1847, by Utagawa Hiroshige
Polychrome woodblock print. Rhode Island School of Design Museum.

Chrysanthemums-One of Twelve Album Leaves-ancient image

Above: Chrysanthemums (One of Twelve Album Leaves/ Flowers of the Twelve Months, 1859), by Zhang Xiong [Chang Hsiung], Chinese (1803-1886). One leaf from an album of eleven (originally twelve) leaves; ink and color on paper; with signature of the artist reading ‘Zhang Xiong.’ Harvard Art Museum.

Chrysanthemums, Degas, 1865 flowers, MET-DT1566

Above: A Woman Seated beside a Vase of Flowers (1865), by Edgar Degas. Oil on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

James Tissot was using his ever-increasing wealth to amass what would become a renowned collection of Chinese and Japanese art, vying with others including Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas, James McNeill Whistler, D.G. Rossetti, Henri Fantin-Latour, and Sarah Bernhardt.

But following the Franco-Prussian War and the bloody Paris Commune, Tissot moved to London in 1871. Two years later, he bought the leasehold to a comfortable suburban villa in St. John’s Wood, west of Regent’s Park, soon adding a large studio, a glass conservatory, and an English-style garden which all provided the setting for him to continue to produce pictures often influenced by the craze for japonisme.

Chrysanthemums, 1871, Henri_Fantin-Latour_-_Vase_of_Chrysanthemums_-_Google_Art_Project            Chrysanthemums-in-a-chinese-vase, Pissarro, 1873.jpg!Large, Wikiart

Above left: Vase of Chrysanthemums, by Henri Fantin-Latour (1871). Oil on canvas. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. (Photo: Wikimedia)

Above right: Chrysanthemums in a Chinese Vase (1873), by Camille Pissarro. Oil on canvas. Private collection. (Photo: Wikiart)

James_Tissot_-_Chrysanthemums

Above: Chrysanthemums (1877), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Chrysanthemums were introduced to England in the late eighteenth century, and their popularity grew during the second half of the nineteenth century. The blooms were available in different colors and varieties, from small pompoms to large closed globes, daisy-like flowers to wispy outspread spiders. While many painters featured them in their work, Tissot redefined such displays with a picture he exhibited at the new Grosvenor Gallery in London in 1877: Chrysanthemums. Rather than a still life, it showed a fleeting moment in a woman’s life. The Times’ critic wrote that it showed, “in particular, his great command of all the executive resources of his art.”

Tissot staged this scene by posing a model outside his conservatory, whose glass panes are visible in the top left corner of the picture. The woman in Chrysanthemums, lost in thought and preoccupied with her work in the huge bank of exuberant white, ivory, yellow, peach, orange, and pink blooms enveloping her, appears startled by the viewer. Tissot uses varied brush strokes to recreate the numerous types of chrysanthemums in his garden. The riot of color and lush textures is quite different than the annual autumn display of chrysanthemums common in the twenty-first century. Tissot’s Chrysanthemums, 1877, celebrates a flower much more exotic, sophisticated, and fascinating than it seems to us now.

Fittingly, Chrysanthemums was exhibited at the Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Art, Kobe, Japan, and at the Shanghai Museum, Shanghai, China, in 2013.

Related posts:

“The three wonders of the world”: Tissot’s japonisme,1864-67

“Chi-so”: Tissot teaches a brother of Japan’s last Shogun, 1868

James Tissot’s brilliant marketing tool, 1869

© 2020 Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).  See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

NOTE:  If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter

Lounging around with James Tissot

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “Lounging around with James Tissot.” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/08/14/lounging-around-with-james-tissot/. <Date viewed>.

 

What do you wear when lounging around the house?

In England in 1866, you might have kept cozy in this colorful twill wool dressing gown with a printed cashmere pattern, now in the collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute.

Marquise de Miramon, Getty Open Content

Portrait of the Marquise de Miramon, née, Thérèse Feuillant (1866), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, unframed: 50 1/2 by 30 3/8 in. (128.3 by 77.2 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.

In Portrait of the Marquise de Miramon (1866), James Tissot depicts the 30-year-old Marquise in her sitting room in her husband’s castle, the château de Paulhac in Auvergne, wearing a pink silk velvet peignoir. The bright pink color was produced with a modern aniline dye, newly available in the past half-dozen years. Ruffles of an even brighter pink trim every edge, including the loose, flared sleeves cut to the elbow on the outside. Under this elaborate, caped and trained dressing gown, she wears a white lace chemise or nightdress with full, three-quarter length sleeves ending in a deep gathered ruffle. She has loosely tied a chic black lace scarf at her throat, which accents her silver cross pendant – her sole piece of jewelry. She wears a white cotton glove edged in a narrow scalloped ruffle; the mate rests on the mantel. A shining black leather shoe peeps out beneath her gown.

IMG_8755 (2), copyright Lucy PaquetteThree years later, in Young women looking at Japanese objects (1869), Tissot features another peignoir – this one in a heavy white fabric (perhaps cotton), and much simpler than the Marquise’s. This peignoir, also caped, is trimmed in white bobble fringe and has a column of white buttons, perhaps abalone shell, from the throat to the hem. The cape, side pocket slits, and hem are accented with a narrow crimson stripe. A small gathered lace ruffle of the white underdress is visible under the round collar, as is the pleated ruffle at the edge of the long sleeves.

Young Women looking at Japanese articles (1869), by James Jacques Joseph Tissot. Oil on canvas, 70.5 x 50.2 cm. Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA; Gift of Henry M. Goodyear, M.D. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in "The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot," by Lucy Paquette © 2012

Young Women looking at Japanese objects (1869), by James Jacques Joseph Tissot. Oil on canvas, 27.75 by 19.75 in. (70.5 by 50.2 cm). Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA; Gift of Henry M. Goodyear, M.D. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot,” by Lucy Paquette © 2012

In one of two variations of this composition, Young women looking at the Chinese temple (1869), the white peignoir functions as a light background for the dark visiting gown worn by the figure in front.

James Tissot, 1869, Japanese Objects, IMG_4848

Young women looking at the Chinese temple (1869), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 22 by 15.5 in. (55.9 by 39.4 cm). Private collection.

The white bobble-fringed peignoir reappears in The Staircase (L’escalier, 1869) and Melancholy (Mélancolie, c. 1869).

James Tissot, 1868, The Staircase, IMG_4852

The Staircase (L’escalier, 1869), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 22 by 15 in. (55.9 by 38.1 cm). Pérez Simón Collection, Mexico City. (Photo by Lucy Paquette)

The model’s pose in The Staircase shows off the bobble trim on the sleeves and along the edge of the train, while a black ribbon at her throat accents and helps define the collar.

James Tissot, 1869 c, Melancholy, IMG_6264

Melancholy (Mélancolie, c. 1869), by James Tissot. Oil on panel, 19.5 by 14.75 in. (49.5 by 37.5 cm). Collection of Ann and Gordon Getty. (Photo by Lucy Paquette)

Melancholy displays the garment’s ruffled cuffs and sleeves, as well as how it fits when the wearer is seated, and we finally glimpse the little black slippers she wears with it. The thickness and weight of the fabric is evident in this picture.

Artwork by Alfred Stevens, The Visit (La Visite), Made of Oil on canvas

Tissot’s choice of the white peignoir, visually interesting while a versatile compositional device, was shrewd.

In his friend Alfred Steven’s painting, The Visit (c. 1869), the ornate pattern of white lace over the pale pink dressing gown works in this composition’s complicated interplay of color, pattern, shape and line.

But in Stevens’ The Psyché (My Studio, c. 1871), the model who peers from behind the cheval mirror in his studio, wears a dressing gown startling similar to the bobble-fringed costume Tissot used to such advantage. Its solid white is a successful foil to the colors and patterns surrounding her. Rather than the bobble trim, a black edging defines the edges of its caped collar, graceful hem, and cuffs, which are punctuated by three black buttons. And at her throat, she wears a chic black scarf, just as Tissot portrayed on the Marquise de Miramon.

File:Stevens, Alfred, The Psyché (My Studio), ca. 1871.jpg

 

Related posts:

A Closer Look at Tissot’s “Young Women Looking at Japanese Articles”

The Artist’s Closet: James Tissot’s Prop Costumes

James Tissot’s Fashion Plates (1864-1878):  A Guest Post by Lucy Paquette

James Tissot and Alfred Stevens

 

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette. All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette. An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.

Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

“Tissot’s wartime sketchbook, 1870-71,” in The Burlington Magazine (July 2020)

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “Tissot’s wartime sketchbook, 1870-71,” in The Burlington Magazine (July 2020). The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/07/13/tissots-wartime-sketchbook-1870-71-in-the-burlington-magazine-july-2020/. <Date viewed>.

 

Grab a glass and your glasses – and let’s toast Tissot; I hope you’ll soon read my new article, “Tissot’s wartime sketchbook, 1870-71,” by Lucy Paquette. The Burlington Magazine, Vol. 162, No. 1408 (July 2020), pp. 560-569 (10 pages).

2020_07, IMG_7064, copyright Lucy PaquetteSome background to the article: James Tissot was at the height of his success by the Salon of 1870, where he exhibited Young Lady in a Boat (Jeune femme en bateau), lent by a Philadelphia millionaire living in Paris who had bought it for 3,300 francs and The Foursome (Partie carrée), a light-hearted and fully clothed eighteenth-century take on Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass  which brought him 8,000 francs from a dealer who sold it to the wife of a French banker. These were very high prices, reflecting the young painter’s renown.

Tissot had made it in Paris on his own from the time he was 19, and at 33, he evidently was content to live well, contribute wicked caricatures of world figures to a slightly subversive London Society magazine, Vanity Fair, and maintain a fairly low profile in the art world he had conquered within a decade of his arrival as a provincial art student.

In his new villa in the most fashionable avenue in Paris, his chic studio had quickly become a showcase for his renowned collection of Japanese art; it was a landmark to see when touring Paris – and, for Tissot, it was a brilliant marketing tool to attract commissions.

James Tissot, La_Partie_carrée (1)

The Foursome (1870), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 47 by 56 in. (114.3 by 142.2 cm). National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. (Wiki)

These two paintings reflect Tissot’s carefree life in the early months of 1870, and I rediscovered a drawing by Tissot here in the U.S. – a surprising sketch that places him in Italy a month before Napoléon declared war on Prussia in July of that year.

How prepared was France for war?

1869, VF cartoon, Napoleon III, by Tissot, 2014.254_print, Cleveland Museum, CC license, TIFF available

Vanity Fair, Sept. 4, 1869: Sovereigns, No. 1 “Le regime parlementaire” (1869), by James Tissot. Color lithograph. Wove paper, 30.3 x 18.9 cm (11 15/16 x 7 7/16 in.) The Cleveland Museum of Art. Bequest of John Bonebrake 2014.254. Open Access.

Tissot began depicting this period in French history a year before it began, with the September 4, 1869 publication of his trenchant Vanity Fair political cartoon of a puny, weak and weary Napoléon III, ruler of “le régime parlementaire,” leaning on the supportive arm of Marianne, the symbol of republican France.

What role did James Tissot, a wealthy and successful young painter, play in the war?

James Tissot, 1877, Comedie-Francaise, 1977.7 CLARK ART

Foyer of the Comédie-Française (Souvenir of the Siege of Paris) (1877), by James Tissot. Etching and drypoint on cream laid paper. Image: 14 15/16 x 10 13/16 in. (38 x 27.5 cm). Object 1977.7. Clark Art Institute. Williamstown, Massachusetts. Open Access.

In 1877, Tissot published an etching of a makeshift French hospital during the Franco-Prussian War: Foyer of the Comédie-Française. It was subtitled, Souvenir of the Siege of Paris.

But was this luxurious haven the reality of a wartime hospital? My research uncovered the fact that James Tissot became involved with a very different medical facility – days before he, unexpectedly, was sent to fight in the front line.

James Tissot, 1877, le-premier-homme-tue-que-jai-vu-souvenir-du-sige-de-paris-the-first-killed-i-saw-souvenir-of-the-siege-of-paris

Le premier homme tué que j’ai vu (Souvenir du siège de Paris) (The First Killed I Saw (Souvenir of the Siege of Paris)), by James Tissot.  (Courtesy of http://www.jamestissot.org)

In 1876, Tissot published an etching called The First Killed I Saw. Who, exactly, was the first man that Tissot saw killed? Was it this soldier, who plummeted with his rifle from a lookout atop a rocky precipice?

And is it possible this young man was Edgar Degas’ friend, the sculptor, Joseph Cuvelier?

Burlington Magazine, Cover, July 2020, their copyrightIf you enjoy reading about the Impressionists and the Franco-Prussian War, you’ll find my article in The Burlington of interest.

Below, you’ll find several links to previous blog posts that provide additional context to this fascinating period.

James Tissot, known for his realistic, detailed depictions of women’s fashions, was equally adept at a completely different type of work. These drawings and watercolors, which were not exhibited during his lifetime, reveal more about an enigmatic man.

My gratitude to Burlington Editor Michael Hall, Assistant Articles Editor Sarah Bolwell, and the layout and design team.

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

Related posts:

“Napoleon is an idiot”: Courbet & the Fall of the Second Empire, 1870

James Tissot & Tommy Bowles Brave the Siege Together: October 1870

Courage & Cowardice: The Impressionists at War, 1870 (Part 1 of 2)

Courage & Cowardice: The Impressionists at War, 1870 (Part 2 of 2)

James Tissot and The Artists’ Brigade, 1870-71

Paris, June 1871

London, June 1871

The Artists’ Rifles, London

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

The few images of people of color by the Impressionists and James Tissot

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “The few images of people of color by the Impressionists and James Tissot.” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/06/15/the-few-images-of-people-of-color-by-the-impressionists-and-james-tissot/. <Date viewed>.

 

How hard is it to think of an Impressionist painting that features a black model?

1862, Manet, Baudelaire's Mistress, Jeanne_Duval, WIKI

Baudelaire’s Mistress, Reclining (Jeanne Duval, 1862), by Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 90 by 113 cm. Szépművészeti Múzeum, Budapest, Hungary. (Wiki)

And yet, surely you’ve seen Manet’s painting, Baudelaire’s Mistress, Reclining (1862). That skirt! The subject, Jeanne Duval, is no shrinking violet; in fact, her bold posture and frank gaze makes the aristocratic Berthe Morisot seem timid in Manet’s Repose (c. 1871).

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Repose (c. 1871), by Édouard Manet. Rhode Island School of Design Museum

Jeanne Duval was born in Haiti in the 1820s. Duval’s grandmother, a slave from Guinea, was sent to Europe to work in a brothel, and it’s likely that Jeanne’s father and grandfather were both white.

When she moved to France, she played bit parts at a small theater in the Latin Quarter, where she met the man who would become known as the photographer Nadar. She was Nadar’s mistress in 1838-39, when he was 18 and 19. In 1842, his friend, a free-spending dandy named Charles Baudelaire, saw her perform and was immediately infatuated with her; she became his “mistress of mistresses.”

Scholarly articles by Marc Christophe (1990) and Therese Dolan (1997) shed light on their intense and stormy twenty-year relationship, and Duval was the subject of a major exhibition at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in 2003 based on the work of poet, artist, photographer and historian Maud Sulter.

Dessin_de_Jeanne_Duval_, by Baudelaire - WIKI

Jeanne Duval (c. 1850), by Charles Baudelaire

Nadar, who did not photograph Duval, described her in terms equally sexist and racist which are only hinted at in this brief excerpt: “A tall, almost too tall girl…A special dish for the ultra-refined palate. Beneath the impetuous luxuriance of her ink-black and curling mane, her eyes, large as soup-plates, seemed blacker still…She looked serious, proud, even a bit disdainful.  Her figure was long-waisted, graceful and undulating as a snake…”

Gustave Courbet painted Duval standing next to Baudelaire in The Artist’s Studio (1854-55, Musée d’Orsay), but the figure was removed at the poet’s request after a quarrel. Four years later, Duval suffered a stroke. In 1862, Baudelaire told his mother his liaison with Duval was over, but three years later, while in Brussels, he made a pen and ink drawing of her (below) from memory.

1850 c, Baudelaire drawing of Jeanne_Duval, WIKI

Portrait of Jeanne Duval (1865), by Charles Baudelaire. Pencil and ink, 20.6 by 14.5 cm. Musée d’Orsay (Wiki)

Manet exhibited his painting of Duval in 1865, at the Galerie Martinet. Nadar claimed to have last seen Duval around 1870, on crutches and rapidly declining from syphilis. (Baudelaire, who had shown symptoms of syphilis from the time he met Duval, died from its effects in 1867.) Manet’s untitled, undated picture was found in his studio after his death in 1883, and his wife, Suzanne, helped the notaries to title it merely Baudelaire’s Mistress for their inventory. A small watercolor version is in the collection of the Kunsthalle Bremen, Germany.

In 1861 or 1862, Manet painted a black nurse with the little girl on the right in Children in the Tuileries Gardens (Rhode Island School of Design Museum). Only recently has the woman been identified as Laure; Manet described her as a “very beautiful black woman” and recorded her address in a studio notebook.

RISDM 42-190

Children in the Tuileries Gardens (c. 1861-62), by Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 37.8 x 46 cm (14 7/8 x 18 1/8 inches). Rhode Island School of Design Museum.

In 1862, Manet painted a bust-length portrait of an unnamed woman, La Négresse, now subtitled Portrait of Laure (Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli Gallery, Turin, Italy), which later was owned by Manet’s one-time student, Éva Gonzalès.

AGN_001

La Négresse (Portrait of Laure), by Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 61 by 50 cm (24 by 20 in.). Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli Gallery, Turin, Italy (Wiki)

And now we know it is Laure who modeled for the maid in Olympia, which Manet exhibited at the Salon in 1865.

An important work on the black female body is “Olympia’s Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity,” written in 1992 by American artist and critic Lorraine O’Grady. But it was Denise Murrell   who discovered that this black woman was named Laure, a “free, wage-earning woman” who lived among the Impressionists in the Batignolles neighborhood of Paris, in researching her 2014 thesis, “Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today.”

This research was the basis for an exhibition of the same name held at Columbia University’s Wallach Art Gallery in New York from October 24, 2018 – February 10, 2019. Dr. Murrell, the museum’s first Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Research Scholar, curated the show. An expanded version, “The Black Model, from Géricault to Matisse,” was held at the Musée d’Orsay from March 26 – July 14, 2019, and Dr. Murrell was a co-curator. In January of this year, she began her new post of associate curator for 19th- and 20th-century art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, making her the first full-time black curator on the Met’s staff.

1863, Manet, Olympia, Musée_d'Orsay, WIKI

Olympia (1863), by Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 130 by 190 cm. Musée d’Orsay. (Wiki)

In 1869 or 1870, Frédéric Bazille painted La Toilette, featuring an exotically-garbed black servant in the foreground, viewed from the back and partially nude. He believed the Salon jury would be impressed by this Orientalist touch, and so he spared no expense. “I have found a ravishing model who is going to cost me an arm and a leg,” he wrote to his mother, “10 francs a day plus bus fare for her and for her mother who accompanies her.” He later added the figure on the right, believed to be Lise Tréhot, Renoir’s companion and model. The jury rejected this work for the Salon in 1870, perhaps punishing Bazille for a painterly style too similar to Manet’s.

1869-70, Bazille, La_Toilette, Musee_Fabre, Montpelier, WIKI

La Toilette, by Frédéric Bazille. Oil on canvas, 52 by 50 in. (132 by 127 cm). Musée Fabre, Montpellier, France. (Wiki)

Bazille also painted his new model in modern attire in Young Woman with Peonies (National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.) in 1870, giving the completed canvas to his friend, the musician and art collector, Edmond Maître.

1870, Bazille, Young Woman with Peonies, NGA

Young Woman with Peonies (1870), by Frédéric Bazille. Oil on canvas, 60 by 74 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

A second version of this painting is known as African Woman with Peonies. Though the model is unknown, it is striking that Bazille featured her in these attentive character studies. She, with her expressive eyes, hands and self-possessed demeanor, is the subject of both canvases, amid the Dutch-inspired floral still life. Who knows how else he may have depicted this woman who knew her own worth and whom he valued, had he not been killed in the Franco-Prussian War in 1870, at age 28? His family kept this painting until his brother gifted it and La Toilette to the Musée Fabre in Montpellier in 1918.

1870, Bazille, Young Woman with Peonies, Fabre Museum, WIKI

African Woman with Peonies (1870), by Frédéric Bazille. Oil on canvas, 60 by 75 cm. Musée Fabre, Montpellier, France. (Wiki)

Another artist who was killed in the Franco-Prussian War, Henri Regnault, painted a black model, a man, in a grisly work, Execution without Judgment under the Moorish Kings (1870, Museé d’Orsay). Regnault’s image is, however, in the Orientalist tradition of painters like Eugène Delacroix and Jean-Léon Gérôme rather than a depiction of a contemporary black person like Bazille’s woman arranging peonies.

1870, Regnault, Execution without Judgment, Musee d'Orsay, WIKI

Execution without Judgment under the Moorish Kings (1870), by Henri Regnault. Oil on canvas, 301 by 143 cm. Museé d’Orsay. (Wiki).

In 1871, when James Tissot left the turmoil of war-torn Paris for London, his American-born friend who lived there, James Whistler, famously painted his mother. In a 2018 article for BBC Culture, American poet and art critic Kelly Grovier wrote of Whistler’s “penchant for racist remarks and his fondness for slapping abolitionists in the face. The artist of course shouldn’t be tarred by the appalling allegiances of his brother, who wore the grey uniform of the Confederacy in its doomed efforts to perpetuate slavery, but the fact adds context. Whistler’s mother herself, who once tried to stop the black wife of her uncle and their children from acquiring family land, makes an ironic subject for a painting whose official title, on reflection, feels more than a little racially charged: Arrangement in Grey and Black.”

A reviewer for for James Abbott McNeill Whistler: A Life, by Gordon Fleming (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991), wrote, “This withering biography knocks Whistler (1834-1903) off a pedestal. The man [was] a combative hothead given to fistfights, a racist who once punched a Haitian in the face simply because he was black.”

A 2001 review in the Hartford Courant of an exhibition of Whistler’s lithographs at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art begins with the curator’s observation, “James McNeill Whistler was not a nice man.” The reviewer comments, “Even though Whistler, a West Point dropout and native of Lowell, Mass., was safely out of the country, happily pursuing a bohemian life in Europe during the Civil War, he remained a stalwart supporter of the Confederate cause and remained a virulent racist throughout his life.”

It appears there are no images of people of color in Whistler’s work.

1872, Degas, children-on-a-doorstep, WIKI

Courtyard of a House (New Orleans, a sketch), also known as Children on a Doorstep, 1872, by Edgar Degas. Oil on canvas, 60 by 73.5 cm. Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen, Denmark. (Wiki)

Tissot’s good friend Edgar Degas visited New Orleans during the Reconstruction period from late October 1872 to early March 1873; his Creole mother’s family, the Mussons, lived there, but another branch of the family that lived there was black, as discussed in a 1999 review in the New York Times of “Degas and New Orleans: A French Impressionist in America,” at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Degas’ maternal grandfather was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, of French parentage into the wealthy planter class and had made a fortune in Louisiana cotton. Degas’ mother died when he was thirteen, and he was visiting her younger brother, Michel Musson, who lived in a rented mansion and kept black servants. Edgar’s brother, René, had joined Michel’s cotton business and married one of his daughters, Estelle. The extended family lived together.

Art critic and scholar Christopher Benfey, author of Degas in New Orleans: Encounters in the Creole World of Kate Chopin and George Washington Cable (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997), previously had “set the city astir by revealing that a branch of the Degas family in this city is descended from a black woman, Constance Vivant, who had six children with Vincent Rillieux, a brother of Degas’s maternal grandmother. One of the children, Norbert Rillieux, became a prominent engineer responsible for advances in sugar refining.” [The reviewer notes, “Neither the Rillieuxes nor the Mussons knew of each other before Mr. Benfey’s book.”]

The reviewer adds, “Mr. Benfey’s book went on to point out the membership of several of Degas’s close relatives here, including René, in the Crescent City White League, a fundamentally racist group bent on wresting political power from the more diverse (if no less corrupt) post-Civil War carpetbaggers…Degas himself wrote frequently in his letters home about black people observed in the street, black women taking care of white children. But with the exception of one partly obscured figure in one painting, he didn’t paint them.”

That painting is Courtyard of a House (New Orleans, a sketch), also known as Children on a Doorstep (Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen, Denmark), which depicts a black nurse watching children of varied skin tones in the large Musson household in the French Quarter in 1872. Degas’ letters from New Orleans to his friends in Paris discussing “the black world” use racist terminology (such as “quadroon” and “forests of ebony”). He notes of the racial mingling in this Southern city, “I shall be very surprised to live among white people only in Paris.”

In 1873, Degas painted A Cotton Office in New Orleans (Musée des beaux-arts de Pau, France), which portrays Michel Musson with his partners and others, including Degas’ brothers René and Achille. It was exhibited in the second Impressionist show in Paris in 1876 and was the first painting by an Impressionist to be purchased by a museum, the newly-founded Musée des beaux-arts de Pau, France, in 1878.

1879, Degas, Miss La La at the Cirque Fernando, National Gallery London, WIKI

Miss La La at the Cirque Fernando (1879), by Edgar Degas. Oil on canvas, 117.2 by 77.5 cm. National Gallery, London. (Wiki)

1880, Miss_Lala

Miss Lala (1880) (Wiki)

Several years later, Degas painted a circus performer of mixed race, a petite twenty-one year old woman named Olga Brown, known as Miss La La, who had been born in Stettin (now in Poland) to a black father and a white mother.

She began performing at age 9, eventually touring circuses and music halls throughout Europe and also performing at London’s Royal Aquarium central hall and Manchester’s Gaiety Theatre. A 2007 article by Marilyn R. Brown reveals much more about her.

In January 1879, Degas attended several of this superstar’s aerial performances at the Cirque Fernando in Montmartre. Suspended from a rope clenched between her teeth, the exceptionally strong acrobat was raised seventy feet toward the circus’s domed ceiling. Degas made multiple studies, in graphic, pastel, and oil, of Miss La La and the circus building, and she visited his studio in the rue Fontaine, near the Cirque Fernando. In his diary, he referred to her as “my beautiful negress.” A pastel study at the Getty shows how he lightened the performer’s skin tone in the completed painting, which focuses on her dramatic feat. He identified her only by her stage name.

The painting was first shown at the Fourth Impressionist Exhibition in Paris in 1879.

1879, Degas, Miss La La at the Cirque Fernando, pastel, GETTY Open Content

Miss Lala at the Fernando Circus (1879), by Edgar Degas. Pastel on faded blue paper, 46.4 by 29.8 cm (18 1/4 by 11 3/4 in.) Getty Open Content.

An 1883 poster advertises Miss La La’s performances, twice a day, at the Hippodrome at the Pont de l’Alma, the setting of James Tissot’s painting of [white] performers in glittering costumes, Women of Paris: The Ladies of the Chariots, exhibited in Paris in 1885 and in London in 1886.

Tissot seems to have made friends easily and maintained numerous mutually satisfying relationships over many years – with both men and women, of varied ages, religions, sexual orientations, backgrounds, and temperaments. But there is no documentation on his views on race or any relationships he might have had with people of color, and in his paintings of groups that included soldiers, sailors, dock workers, and servants, all the figures are white.

1867, Tissot, beating-the-retreat-in-the-tuileries-gardens, WIKI-I think

Beating the Retreat in the Tuileries Gardens (1867), by James Tissot. Oil on panel. Private collection. (Photo: Wikipaintings.org)

But James Tissot made one image of a person of color: the Zouave drummer of the Imperial Guard who is the main figure in Beating the Retreat in the Tuileries Gardens (1867, private collection). In late 1854, Napoléon III ordered a special regiment, the Zouaves of the Imperial Guard, created from the Zouave regiments in the French Army. These Zouaves, by this time native Frenchmen stationed in Algeria, originally were members of the fierce Kabyli tribe of Zouaoua living in the rocky hills of Algeria and Morocco who had volunteered to fight with the French colonial army in 1830. Formed on March 15, 1855, the Zouaves of the Imperial Guard served through all the campaigns of the Second Empire, including the Franco-Austrian War of 1859 and the Mexican Intervention (1864-66). The Zouaves earned a reputation for reckless bravery, and they became famous for their distinctive uniforms, which included a short, collarless, open-fronted jacket, baggy trousers, sashes and Oriental head gear, modeled on Algerian native dress.

In this one picture, Tissot the Realist painter gives us a glimpse of a moment he engaged with a person of color, whom he clearly respected: he made a detailed, sensitive and fairly large oil study of the man, inscribed with his name and military unit, Jousef/Ben Moustapha/3ième Bataillon. Tissot exhibited the painting at the Salon in 1868, where it was purchased for 7,000 francs by the emperor’s cousin, Princess Mathilde.

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

Related posts:

The Company He Kept: James Tissot’s Friends

“Chi-so”: Tissot teaches a brother of Japan’s last Shogun, 1868

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Tissot’s Illustrations for Renée Mauperin (1884)

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “Tissot’s Illustrations for Renée Mauperin (1884).” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/05/15/tissots-illustrations-for-renee-mauperin-1884/. <Date viewed>.

 

Renée Mauperin, a novel by brothers Jules and Edmond de Goncourt, initially was published in 1864, then in several other editions, before surviving brother Edmond discussed illustrations for a new edition with James Tissot in late May 1882, in Paris. At the time, Tissot was living in London with young Kathleen Newton, who had moved into his St. John’s Wood home around 1876.

Kathleen, declining from tuberculosis, would model for the novel’s tragic heroine, who in the last third of the story suffered from debilitating heart disease. Some of Tissot’s illustrations were based on photographs of Kathleen, and he posed for some of the male figures. Her son Cecil Newton appears in one of the etchings, along with girls who may have been his sister, Violet, and Kathleen’s sister’s daughters, Belle and Lilian.

Edmond_de_Goncourt_by_Nadar_c1877, wiki

Edmond de Goncourt (c. 1877), by Nadar. (Wiki)

Kathleen Newton died of tuberculosis on November 9, 1882, at age 28, with her sister, Polly Hervey, at her side (according to the death register). Tissot draped the coffin in purple velvet and prayed beside it for hours. Immediately after the funeral on November 14, at the Church of Our Lady in Lisson Grove, St. John’s Wood, Tissot returned to Paris. On the morning of November 15, he called on Edmond de Goncourt, who noted in his journal that the artist was “very affected by the death of the English Mauperin.”

Renée Mauperin, illustrated with ten etchings by James Tissot, was published in 1884 in Paris by Charpentier.

In 1888, the English edition, published by Vizetelly, contained a prefatory note by Émile Zola:

“For many people…this is Messieurs de Goncourt’s masterpiece. The authors’ object has been to depict a phase of contemporary middle-class life. Their heroine, Renée, the most prominent personage of the story, is a strange girl, half a boy, who has been brought up in the chaste ignorance of virgins..Spoilt by her father, she has grown upon the dunghill of advanced civilization with an artistic soul and a nervous, refined temperament. She is the most adorable little thing imaginable, she talks slang, she paints and acts, her mind is awake to every form of curiosity, and she is possessed of masculine pride, straightforwardness, and honesty.”

However, due to an action she takes, her brother, Henri, is killed in a duel, and “Renée, horrified by what she has done, slowly dies of heart disease, her distressing agony lasting through nearly one-third of the volume.”

Below, excerpts from the novel accompany each etching, providing the story in brief. I have used The Project Gutenberg eBook, Renée Mauperin, by Edmond de Goncourt and Jules de Goncourt, et al., Translated by Alys Hallard (1902).

 

RENÉE MAUPERIN, RENÉE AND REVERCHON SWIMMING IN THE SEINE (FRONTISPIECE), Clark

RENÉE MAUPERIN: RENÉE AND REVERCHON SWIMMING IN THE SEINE (FRONTISPIECE), by James Tissot. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Open Access.

I

“You would soon find out what a bore it is to be always proper. We are allowed to dance, but do you imagine that we can talk to our partner? We may say ‘Yes,’ ‘No,’ ‘No,’ ‘Yes,’ and that’s all! We must always keep to monosyllables, as that is considered proper. You see how delightful our existence is. And for everything it is just the same. If we want to be very proper we have to act like simpletons; and for my part I cannot do it. Then we are supposed to stop and prattle to persons of our own sex. And if we go off and leave them and are seen talking to men instead – oh, well, I’ve had lectures enough from mamma about that!”

This was said in an arm of the Seine just between Briche and the Île Saint Denis. The girl and the young man who were conversing were in the water. They had been swimming until they were tired, and now, carried along by the current, they had caught hold of a rope which was fastened to one of the large boats stationed along the banks of the island.

“Ah, now this, for instance,” she continued, “cannot be at all proper – to be swimming here with you.”

 

Renee Mauperin, Renee Hugging her Father as She Comes in to Breakfast, PRINCETON, non-commercial

Renee Mauperin: Renee Hugging her Father as She Comes in to Breakfast (Beraldi 54)
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 14.1 x 10 cm (5 9/16 x 3 15/16 in.) sheet: 19.1 x 16 cm. (7 1/2 x 6 5/16 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-250 a. Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

IX

“Well!” exclaimed Renée, entering the dining-room at eleven o’clock, breathless like a child who had been running, “I thought every one would be down. Where is mamma?”

“Gone to Paris – shopping,” answered M. Mauperin.

“Good-morning, papa!” And instead of taking her seat Renée went across to her father and putting her arms round his neck began to kiss him.

“There, there, that’s enough – you silly child!” said M. Mauperin, smiling as he endeavoured to free himself.

And Renée, standing up after kissing him once more, moved back from her father, still holding his head between her hands. They gazed at each other lovingly and earnestly, looking into one another’s eyes. The French window was open and the light, the scents and the various noises from the garden penetrated into the room.

 

RENÉE MAUPERIN, DENOISEL READING IN THE GARDEN, RENÉE APPROACHING, Clark

RENÉE MAUPERIN: DENOISEL READING IN THE GARDEN, RENÉE APPROACHING, by James Tissot. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Open Access.

IX

Denoisel, left to himself, lighted a cigar, picked up a book and went out to one of the garden seats to read. He had been there about two hours when he saw Renée coming towards him. She had her hat on and her animated face shone with joy and a sort of serene excitement.

“Well, have you been out? Where have you come from?”

“Where have I come from?” repeated Renée, unfastening her hat. “Well, I’ll tell you, as you are my friend,” and she took her hat off and threw her head back with that pretty gesture women have for shaking their hair into place. “I’ve come from church, and if you want to know what I’ve been doing there, why, I’ve been asking God to let me die before papa.”

 

Renee Mauperin, Renee Sitting at the Piano, Crying, PRINCETON, non-commercial only

Renee Mauperin: Renee Sitting at the Piano, Crying
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 14.3 x 9.8 cm. (5 5/8 x 3 7/8 in.) sheet: 28.7 x 22.3 cm. (11 5/16 x 8 3/4 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-252 a
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

XXVII

Denoisel had left Renée at her piano, and had gone out into the garden. As he came back towards the house he was surprised to hear her playing something that was not the piece she was learning; then all at once the music broke off and all was silent. He went to the drawing-room, pushed the door open, and discovered Renée seated on the music-stool, her face buried in her hands, weeping bitterly.

“Renée, good heavens! What in the world is the matter?”

Two or three sobs prevented Renée’s answering at first, and then, wiping her eyes with the backs of her hands, as children do, she said in a voice choked with tears:

“It’s – it’s – too stupid. It’s this thing of Chopin’s, for his funeral, you know – his funeral mass, that he composed. Papa always tells me not to play it. As there was no one in the house to-day – I thought you were at the bottom of the garden – oh, I knew very well what would happen, but I wanted to make myself cry with it, and you see it has answered to my heart’s content. Isn’t it silly of me – and for me, too, when I’m naturally so fond of fun!”

 

Renee Mauperin, Denoisel and Henri Mauperin in the Latter's Rooms, PRINCETON, non-commercial

Renee Mauperin: Denoisel and Henri Mauperin in the Latter’s Rooms (Beraldi 57)
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching; early state. Plate: 10.1 x 14 cm (4 x 5 1/2 in.) sheet: 21.5 x 28.8 cm (8 7/16 x 11 5/16 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-253 a
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

XXXIV

Denoisel was at Henri Mauperin’s. They were sitting by the fire talking and smoking. Suddenly they heard a noise and a discussion in the hall, and, almost at the same time, the room door was opened violently and a man entered abruptly, pushing aside the domestic who was trying to keep him back.

“M. Mauperin de Villacourt?” he demanded.

“That is my name, monsieur,” said Henri, rising.

“Well, my name is Boisjorand de Villacourt,” and with the back of his hand he gave Henri a blow which made his face bleed. Henri turned as white as the silk scarf he was wearing as a necktie and, with the blood trickling down his face, he bent forward to return the blow, and then, just as suddenly, drew himself up and stretched his hand out towards Denoisel, who stepped forward, folded his arms, and spoke in his calmest tone:

“I think I understand what you mean, sir,” he said; “you consider that there is a Villacourt too many. I think so too.”

The visitor was visibly embarrassed before the calmness of this man of the world. He took off his hat, which he had kept on his head hitherto, and began to stammer out a few words.

“Will you kindly leave your address with my servant?” said Henri, interrupting him; “I will send round to you to-morrow.”

 

RENÉE MAUPERIN, HENRI MAUPERIN WOUNDED AFTER THE DUEL WITH BOISJORAND DE VILLACOURT, Clark

RENÉE MAUPERIN: HENRI MAUPERIN WOUNDED AFTER THE DUEL WITH BOISJORAND DE VILLACOURT, by James Tissot. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Open Access.

XXXVIII

M. de Villacourt took off his frock-coat, tore off his necktie, and threw them both some distance from him. His shirt was open at the neck, showing his strong, broad, hairy chest. The opponents were armed, and the seconds moved back and stood together on one side.

“Ready!” cried a voice.

At this word M. de Villacourt moved forward almost in a straight line. Henri kept quite still and allowed him to walk five paces. At the sixth he fired.

M. de Villacourt fell to the ground, and the witnesses watched him lay down his pistol and press his thumbs with all his strength on the double hole which the bullet had made on entering his body.

“Ah! I’m not done for – Ready, monsieur!” he called out in a loud voice to Henri, who, thinking all was over, was moving away.

M. de Villacourt picked up his pistol and proceeded to do his four remaining paces as far as the walking-stick, dragging himself along on his hands and knees and leaving a track of blood on the snow behind him. On arriving at the stick he rested his elbow on the ground and took aim slowly and steadily.

“Fire! Fire!” called out Dardouillet.

Henri, standing still and covering his face with his pistol, was waiting. He was pale, and there was a proud, haughty look about him. The shot was fired; he staggered a second, then fell flat, with his face on the ground and with outstretched arms, his twitching fingers grasping for a moment at the snow.

 

Renee Mauperin, Renee Fainting after Hearing of her Brother's Death in the Duel, PRINCETON, non-commercial

Renee Mauperin: Renee Fainting after Hearing of her Brother’s Death in the Duel
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 11 x 14.2 cm. (4 5/16 x 5 9/16 in.) sheet: 22.5 x 22.8 cm. (8 7/8 x 9 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-255 a
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

XL

Denoisel opened the drawing-room door and saw Renée, seated on an ottoman, sobbing, with her handkerchief up to her mouth.

“Renée,” he said, going to her and taking her hands in his, “some one killed him –”

Renée looked at him and then lowered her eyes.

“That man would never have known; he never read anything and he did not see any one; he lived like a regular wolf; he didn’t subscribe to the Moniteur, of course. Do you understand?”

“No,” stammered Renée, trembling all over.

“Well, it must have been an enemy who sent the paper to that man. Ah, you can’t understand such cowardly things; but that’s how it all came about, though. One of his seconds showed me the paper with the paragraph marked –”

Renée was standing up, her eyes wide open with terror; her lips moved and she opened her mouth to speak – to cry out: “I sent it!”

Then all at once she put her hand to her heart, as if she had just been wounded there, and fell down unconscious and rigid on the carpet.

 

Renee Mauperin, M. Mauperin Sitting in a Public Garden in Paris, PRINCETON, non-commercial

Renee Mauperin: M. Mauperin Sitting in a Public Garden in Paris
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 14 x 9.7 cm. (5 1/2 x 3 13/16 in.) sheet: 19 x 15.7 cm. (7 1/2 x 6 3/16 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-256 a
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

XLIV

Sometimes, as though he were answering inquiries about his daughter, he would say aloud, “Oh, yes, she is very ill!” and it was as though the words he had uttered had been said by some one else at his side. Often a work-girl without any hat, a pretty young girl with a round waist, gay and healthy with the rude health of her class, would pass by him. He would cross the street that he might not see her again. He was furious just for a minute with all these people who passed him, with all these useless lives. They were not beloved as his daughter was, and there was no need for them to go on living. He went into one of the public gardens and sat down. A child put some of its little sand-pies on to the tails of his coat; other children getting bolder approached him with all the daring of sparrows. Presently, feeling slightly embarrassed, they left their little spades, stopped playing and stood round, looking shyly and sympathetically, like so many men and women in miniature, at this tall gentleman who was so sad. M. Mauperin rose and left the garden.

 

Renee Mauperin, Renee and Her Father Sitting in the Porch of the Church at Morimond, PRINCETON, non-commercial

Renee Mauperin: Renee and Her Father Sitting in the Porch of the Church at Morimond
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 15.1 x 9.6 cm. (5 15/16 x 3 3/4 in.) sheet: 33.4 x 20.5 cm. (13 1/8 x 8 1/16 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-257 b
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

LI

There was a stone seat under the porch with a ray of sunshine falling on it.

“It’s warm here,” she said, laying her hand on the stone. “Put my shawl there so that I can sit down a little. I shall have the sun on my back—there.”

“Ah!” said Renée after a few moments, “we ought to have been made of something else. Why did God make us of flesh and blood? It’s frightful!”

Her eyes had fallen on some soil turned up in a corner of the cemetery, half hidden by two barrel-hoops crossed over each other and up which wild convolvulus was growing.

 

Renee Mauperin, M. and Mme. Mauperin in Egypt, PRINCETON, non-commercial only

Renee Mauperin: M. and Mme. Mauperin in Egypt, 1882
James Tissot, French, 1836–1902
Etching. Plate: 10.7 x 14 cm. (4 3/16 x 5 1/2 in.) sheet: 21 x 33.2 cm. (8 1/4 x 13 1/16 in.)
Gift of Frank Jewett Mather Jr. x1944-258 b
Princeton University Art Museum, public domain for personal and educational use.

LXV

People who travel in far countries may have come across, in various cities or among old ruins – one year in Russia, another perhaps in Egypt – an elderly couple who seem to be always moving about, neither seeing nor even looking at anything. They are the Mauperins, the poor heart-broken father and mother, who are now quite alone in the world, Renée’s sister having died after the birth of her first child.

They sold all they possessed and set out to wander round the world. They no longer care for anything, and go about from one country to another, from one hotel to the next, with no interest whatever in life. They are like things which have been uprooted and flung to the four winds of heaven. They wander about like exiles on earth, rushing away from their tombs, but carrying their dead about with them everywhere, endeavouring to weary out their grief with the fatigue of railway journeys, dragging all that is left them of life to the very ends of the earth, in the hope of wearing it out and so finishing with it.

Related posts:

James Tissot’s Prints

James Tissot’s Model and Muse, Kathleen Newton

Was Cecil Newton James Tissot’s son?

James Tissot Domesticated

James Tissot’s garden idyll & Kathleen Newton’s death

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Ten “missing” Tissot paintings that turned up

 

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “Ten “missing” Tissot paintings that turned up.” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/04/15/ten-missing-tissot-paintings-that-turned-up/. <Date viewed.>

 

Six decades ago, before scholars revived interest in James Tissot, well over a hundred of his oil paintings were unlocated, known only from the photograph album he kept as a record of his artistic output over the course of his career, or from exhibition catalogues, the occasional contemporary photograph, or written references.

Modern James Tissot scholarship began in earnest when Michael J. Wentworth (1938–2002) wrote about the artist for the catalogue of the exhibition “A Generation of Draughtsmen” at the University of Michigan in 1962. Wentworth then was invited to take part in the first retrospective exhibition in 1968, organized by the Rhode Island School of Design and the Art Gallery of Ontario, joining Henri Zerner and David S. Brooke in writing the catalogue. In 1965, Willard E. Misfeldt (1930–2017) began work on a monographic study produced in 1971 as a doctoral dissertation for Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and in 1976, Wentworth produced another such monograph for Harvard University, followed by James Tissot: Catalogue Raisonné of His Prints (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1978).

James Tissot, 1877, Portrait_of_Mrs_Catherine_Smith_Gill_and_Two_of_her_Children_-_Google_Art_Project

Portrait of Mrs Catherine Smith Gill and Two of her Children (1877), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas; 60.04 by 39.96 in. (152.5 by 101.5 cm.). Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, U.K.. (Photo:  Wikimedia.org)

One of the most dramatic rediscoveries of a “missing” oil painting by Tissot at this time was Portrait of Mrs Catherine Smith Gill and Two of her Children (1877). One morning in 1979, as staff was arriving at Liverpool’s Walker Art Gallery, a man approached them saying he had a rare and valuable painting by French painter James Tissot that he wished to sell them. When they told the museum director of this claim, he reacted with disbelief and was inclined to send the man away. The painting, worth £ 30,000, was Tissot’s Portrait of Mrs. Catherine Smith Gill and Two of her Children (1877).  At 60.04 by 39.96 in./152.5 by 101.5 cm, it was one of the largest works the artist ever had produced. The portrait was purchased, with the aid of contributions from the National Art Collections Fund and the Victoria and Albert Museum Purchase Grant Fund, from Berkeley Chapple Gill, grandson of Mrs. Gill – the son of the little boy in the painting – in 1979, and it remains on view at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

In Michael Wentworth’s comprehensive 1984 study, James Tissot (Oxford: Oxford University Press), numerous oil paintings whose location remained unknown were listed and appeared as old photographs, many provided by auction houses that once had offered them for sale, but since lost track of them. Surely due to the increased recognition of James Tissot’s work, many of these “lost” paintings reappeared.

Where were they, then, during the early 1980s as they were the subject of scholarly interest? Let’s look at a few of these pictures that, happily, turned up.

At least two of Tissot’s “missing” paintings were in public collections, but overlooked.

On the River (1871), measuring 85 by 49.5 cm, was sold by a private collector at Sotheby’s, London for $ 1,175/£ 420 in 1964. It was purchased by Jeremy Maas, a London art dealer who sold it to the U.K. Department of the Environment in 1973. As part of the Government Art Collection, On the River is now at the British Embassy in Paris.

James Tissot, 1869, Crack Shot, IMG_4846, ed

At the Rifle Range (also known as Safe to Win, or The Crack Shot, 1869), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 26 5/8 by 18 ¼ in. (67.3 by 46.4 cm). Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire, England, National Trust. Photographed by Lucy Paquette at “James Tissot: Fashion and Faith, Legion of Honor,” San Francisco.

Another painting in an overlooked public collection was At the Rifle Range (also known as Safe to Win, or The Crack Shot, 1869). In his 1984 monograph, James Tissot, Wentworth listed it as “whereabouts unknown,” reproducing an image of it from James Laver’s 1936 book, “Vulgar Society:” the Romantic Career of James Tissot, 1836-1902. In fact, the painting had been acquired by 1936 by the Leicester Galleries in London. Captain George Bambridge (1892–1943), a British diplomat who was married to Rudyard Kipling’s daughter, Elsie (1896–1976), purchased the painting in 1937. From 1938, the childless couple resided at Wimpole Hall, about 8½ miles (14 kilometres) southwest of Cambridge. At the Rifle Range, along with the residence and all its contents, had been left to the National Trust Collections by Mrs. George Bambridge on her death in 1976 and was on display to the public.

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Un déjeuner (A Luncheon, c.1868), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 78.74 by 58.42 cm. Roy Miles Fine Paintings. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot,” by Lucy Paquette © 2012

A few of Tissot’s “lost” paintings had been located by one of these two mid-century scholars, but not the other, as they pursued their parallel research.

For example, in his 1971 thesis, Willard Misfeldt listed A Luncheon (Un déjeuner c. 1868) as unlocated, but in his monograph thirteen years later, Michael Wentworth reported it was in the collection of the Marquis of Bristol, London [Victor Frederick Cochrane Hervey, 6th Marquess of Bristol (1915–1985); after the death of his eldest son, John Hervey, 7th Marquess of Bristol (1954–1999), Un déjeuner was offered for sale at Sotheby’s, New York in 2000 and is now in a private collection].

But, oddly enough, although Misfeldt reported the location of The Partie carrée in his 1971 study as a private collection in Zurich, Wentworth listed it in 1984 as “whereabouts unknown.”

James Tissot, 1870, Partie Carree, IMG_4850, PHOTO BY LUCY PAQUETTE, ed

The Partie carrée (c. 1870), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 47 by 56 in. (114.3 by 142.2 cm). National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photographed by Lucy Paquette at “James Tissot: Fashion and Faith, Legion of Honor,” San Francisco.

In fact, The Partie carrée (The Foursome, c. 1870), exhibited at Salon of 1870, had over the years belonged to collectors in Paris and London until being acquired by a private collector in Zurich by 1968.

In 1993, it was offered for sale at Sotheby’s, London, but it did not find a buyer until it was offered again at Sotheby’s, New York in 1995.

It was in a private collection on the U.S. West Coast by 2001, resold, and purchased in 2018 by the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

Unsurprisingly, it turned out that most of Tissot’s “lost” works belonged to private collectors in the U.K. and the U.S., where his work was most appreciated during his life.

James Tissot, 1869 c, Melancholy, IMG_6264

Melancholy (c. 1869), by James Tissot. Oil on wood panel, 19.5 by 14.75 (49.5 by 37.5 cm). Collection of Ann and Gordon Getty. Photographed by Lucy Paquette at “James Tissot: Fashion and Faith, Legion of Honor,” San Francisco.

The trail had gone cold on Melancholy (c. 1869) after it was sold in 1967 at Sotheby’s, London as Chagrin d’amour, to a private collector. In 1995, that collector sold the picture at the same auction house, where it was considered “a significant rediscovery in the field of nineteenth-century Anglo-French painting.” It now is in the collection of Ann and Gordon Getty, whose foundation provides support for the arts and education in the San Francisco area.

James Tissot, 1874, Waiting, In the Shallows, IMG_4896

Waiting (also known as In the Shallows, 1873), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 22 by 31 in. (55.9 by 78.8 cm). Collection of Diane B. Wilsey, San Francisco. Photographed by Lucy Paquette at “James Tissot: Fashion and Faith, Legion of Honor,” San Francisco.

Tissot exhibited Waiting (also known as In the Shallows, 1873) at the Royal Academy in 1874, along with The Ball on Shipboard (c.1874, Tate) and London Visitors (c.1874, Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio), and though it changed hands numerous times, it remained in the U.K until at least 1896, when it was sold at Christie’s and dropped off the radar. In 2014, Waiting once again was offered for sale at Christie’s, London. Estimated to bring $ 849,500–$ 1,359,200/£ 500,000–£ 800,000, it actually sold for $ 1,635,288/£ 962,500 (Premium). It now is in the collection of Diane B. Wilsey, San Francisco.

Other paintings that had not been located by the early 1980s were in collections outside the U.K. and the U.S.:

James Tissot, 1879, Rivals - Il rivali

Rivals (c. 1878-1879), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 36.25 by 26.75 in. (92 by 68 cm). The Marlene and Spencer Hays Collection. (Photograph: the-athenaeum.org)

Rivals (c. 1878-1879), featuring Kathleen Newton, was exhibited at the Grosvenor Gallery in 1879 and was owned by successive private collectors in the U.K. through mid-1912. The Rivals then was purchased for the Ingegnoli Collection in Milan. It was sold by Paul Ingegnoli’s executors at Galleria Pesaro in 1933 and purchased by a Milanese private collector. It was displayed in public again only in Milan, in 1957, at the Palazzo della Permanente, La Mostra Nazionale di Pittura, “L’Arte e il Convito.”

Then, in 2014, it was sold at Pandolfini Casa d’Aste, Florence, for € 954,600 EUR (Premium) [$ 1,215,969 USD/£ 753,715 GBP]. In pristine condition, it was acquired by Stair Sainty Fine Art, London and displayed at the Stair Sainty booth at TEFAF, the world’s leading art fair, in Maastricht, Netherlands (March 13-22, 2015). The Rivals is now in The Marlene and Spencer Hays Collection; the Hays, an American couple who began collecting French art in the 1970s, chose the Musée d’Orsay in Paris to receive their collection at their deaths.

James Tissot, 1883-85 c, Les_demoiselles_de_province, Tissot

Women of Paris: Provincial Woman (La Femme à Paris: Les demoiselles de province, c. 1883-1885), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 58 by 40.25 in. (147.3 by 102.2 cm). Collection of Diane B. Wilsey, San Francisco. (Photo:  Wikimedia.org)

Les demoiselles de province (Provincial Woman, c. 1883-1885), from La Femme à Paris (Women of Paris) Tissot’s series of fifteen large-scale canvases depicting fashionable parisiennes, was in the U.K. at least through 1905, when it seemed to “go missing.” But since at least 1955, it was in a private collection in Rotterdam and was left to an individual who passed away. It was sold at Christie’s, London in 2015 for £ 1,202,500/$ 1,867,483. It is now in the Collection of Diane B. Wilsey, San Francisco.

James Tissot, 1885, The Apparition, oil, IMG_6469

The Apparition (1885), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 by 21 1/4 in. (74 by 54 cm). Private collection. Photographed by Lucy Paquette at “James Tissot: Fashion and Faith, Legion of Honor,” San Francisco.

At least one of Tissot’s oil paintings, which seems to have disappeared after his death in 1902, recently turned up “in plain sight” – while curators were researching the 2019-2020 James Tissot retrospective exhibition, they were delighted to find that The Apparition (1885) had long been in a private collection on the estate of the remote château in Besançon, in eastern France, once owned by the artist.

Many more of James Tissot’s paintings are still “missing.” When and where will these elusive works turn up?

Related posts:

James Tissot and the Revival of Victorian Art in the 1960s

If only we’d bought James Tissot’s paintings in the 1970s!

James Tissot’s popularity boom in the 1980s

Celebrities & Millionaires Vie for Tissot’s Paintings in the 1990s

The Stars of Victorian Painting: Auction Prices

James Tissot oils at auction: Seven favorites

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).

See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

NOTE:  If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The James Tissot Gift Shop

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “The James Tissot Gift Shop.” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/04/01/the-james-tissot-gift-shop/. <Date viewed.>

 

April 1 is my birthday, so you must expect my annual tradition of a little gentle humor. This year, it’s a little levity during a challenging time as my gift to you: we’re all in this together, and we need to keep our spirits up however we can. Art lovers hunkered down all over the world, this is for you.

Inspired by a Twitter thread last year, in which items found for sale online – such as a shower curtain printed with Lord Byron on his Death Bed (c. 1826, by Joseph-Denis Odevaere) – were suggested for the gift shop at Byron’s ancestral home, Newstead Abbey…allow me to present The James Tissot Gift Shop. Imagine the possibilities for redecorating your home, and transforming your personal style, à la Tissot during the lockdown necessary to keep us all as safe as possible during the coronavirus pandemic.

Shop online, or distract yourself for a few minutes by browsing! You can begin every day on an upbeat note, confidently sipping coffee in your very own Still on Top mug. And don’t prepare another breakfast without your new Ladies of the Cars Apron! Maybe you’d like to linger over breakfast in bed, using your “Waiting for the Fairy” [sic] Serving Tray. [We’re all waiting for the fairy.] Remember to cough into your elbow or your The Bridesmaid napkins. 

Smooth your The Shop Girl duvet cover and replace all your worn hand towels and bath towels with new ones featuring Tissot’s paintings, such as A Woman of Ambition – an image sure to jump-start any endeavor, from organizing your book shelves to home-schooling your children.

Self-care is important; if you’d like the artist moodily assessing you each morning, try this shower curtain.

Tissot gifts, shower curtain, self-portrait-1865-james-tissot

Settle in for the weeks ahead. Toss James Tissot throw pillows on all your armchairs and sofas, suited to your lifestyle and personality: On the Thames, 1876 Throw Pillow or The Captain and the Mate, 1873 Throw Pillow if you’re adventurous; Room Overlooking the Harbour Throw Pillow  or Chrysanthemums, 1876 Throw Pillow if you’re the contemplative type; Hide and Seek Throw Pillow if you have children; or, if you feel the urge to belong vicariously to an elite private club of aristocrats idling away the day (before the days of social distancing) on a balcony of the Hôtel de Coislin overlooking the Place de la Concorde in Paris, the Circle of the rue Royale Throw Pillow.

Tissot gifts, on-the-thames-1876 throw pillow            Tissot gifts, the-convalescent-1876 throw pillow

Marquise de Miramon, Getty Open ContentIf you must leave your house, perhaps to stock up on dried beans and canned tuna, you’ll need the Portrait of the Marquise de Miramon Reusable Grocery Bag.

And if you think, as I do, that the Marquise, née Thérèse Feuillant, is exquisite, you’ll also want her image on a Set of car mats as well as the Crossbody Bag as you deliver some supplies to a neighbor or two.

Otherwise, stay home and make good use of her image on your new Ping Pong Paddle and Playing cards while wearing the All-Over Printed Unisex Tank.

You can find dozens of jigsaw puzzles from Tissot paintings to keep you and your family busy, including the lovely “The Bunch of Lilacs” jigsaw puzzle“Holyday” jigsaw puzzle, and “Afternoon Tea” jigsaw puzzle. And if you’re a reader, you’ll definitely want to download The Hammock: a novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot (remember, there are free reading apps available on Amazon for your PC, tablet and smartphone).

There’s no James Tissot coloring book, but since his paintings showcase women’s fashions of the 1860s, 1870s, and 1880s, lose yourself in the Godey’s Fashions Coloring Book, Late Victorian and Edwardian Fashions Coloring Book, or Victorian Gowns Coloring Book (coloring can be very soothing, since it requires little effort and maintains your focus on something positive and beautiful).

James Tissot, Snack, TheLooking for another creative outlet? You can cross-stitch some of Tissot’s compositions, such as The Gallery of the HMS Calcutta and Reading a Book.

Or enjoy the comfort of baking, using your “Waiting for the Ferry” Cake Pan.

It’s user-recommended as a “nice bridal shower gift,” but don’t be tempted to socialize: please do your part and consume your cakes at home!

Daintily snacking on your own cake is, possibly, one activity for which you’ll enjoy social distancing.

Tissot gifts, yoga mat, abandoned-james-jacques-joseph-tissot

Tissot gifts, yoga mat, jesus-in-prison-tissotTissot Gifts, yoga mat, the-prehistoric-women-james-tissotDo stay fit at home with a wide range of James Tissot yoga mats, though you must brace yourself for the options, which include the Abandoned yoga mat (above), the Prehistoric Women Yoga Mat (left, for a wild workout), and a full selection from Tissot’s Bible illustrations, such as the Adam Is Tempted by Eve Yoga MatThe Wise Virgins yoga mat, the Blind Leading the Blind Yoga Mat, and the truly egregious Jesus in Prison yoga mat (right). You may instead find yourself enchanted by the ethereal beauty and fresh, pure landscape of the Autumn on the Thames yoga mat.

Just remember to stay hydrated with your “Quiet” Stainless Steel Water Bottle.” (Though by now, you also may need either A Type of Beauty beer steins or, at least, the A Type of Beauty hip flask.)

James Tissot, Brooklyn Museum, Jesus_Walks_on_the_Sea_(Jésus_marche_sur_la_mer)_-_James_Tissot_-_overallBut since James Tissot was acclaimed for illustrating the Bible, there are any number of items available reproducing this body of work, which may strike you as irreverent or devotional depending upon your perspective.

As a sampler, let’s look at items featuring his painting, Jesus Walks on the Sea: a table lamp, a pendant lamp [temporarily sold out], a night light, a light switch cover (which, really, was not the best idea), an LED candle, and a snow globe.

There’s also the “Jesus Walks on the Sea” Cutting Board and the “Jesus Walks on the Sea” bottle opener, to which 81% of users give a 5-star rating.

And there are still other ways that The James Tissot Gift Shop can help us make the best of our altered reality.

Working from your new home office? Keep an eye on the time with your The Woman Of Fashion Clock.

If you require new binders to sort your paperwork, there’s something for everyone, e.g. the Emmanuel Chabrier, aged 20, 1861 3-ring binder and the A Tedious Story 3-ring binder (to stuff with everything from tax documents to incoming mail you just cannot deal with right now).

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Need to scribble a shopping list while foraging in the pantry for the mid-day meal? This A Luncheon notebook will come in handy.

But what you really need to organize your every rendez-vous – yes, all those video conferences, FaceTime group calls, Google Hangouts, and daily Skype chats to keep tabs on Grandma and Grandpa – is a planner featuring A Luncheon.

If you’re musical, you’ll be happy to know that A Luncheon also is available on a guitar pick.

Maybe you lack that particular talent, but still, you can “bump up the volume of your favorite jams” with the “Waiting at the Station speaker.”

Be sure to use this time to enliven your wardrobe with some James Tissot style.

Women can start with some investment pieces, such as these “James Tissot Young Lady In A Boat Crew Socks.”

Tissot gifts, crew socks

Step up your game by pairing your new socks with the “Studio11Couture Women Hoodie Dress Hooded Tunic James Tissot Young Lady In A Boat Athleisure Sweatshirt.” You know you want it! No need to pad around your apartment in sweat pants when you can be this glam in comfort.

Tissot gifts, Lady on Boat hoodie

James Tissot Gift Shop, portrait-of-eugene-coppens-de-fontenay-1867-james-jacques-joseph-tissot

Male admirers of James Tissot will have to be content, for the foreseeable future, with T-shirts and hoodies until public gatherings again are permissible.

Then, you can sport enough chic ties, announcing your newfound fashion sense, to bring every passing stranger within three feet of you. Prepare yourself.

In the meantime, be safe, my dears! Wash your hands, look out for your loved ones and your neighbors, and stay home. Thanks for sharing a little laughter to celebrate my birthday with me.

And in light of the Covid-19 crisis, there’s one last item in The James Tissot Gift Shop you might consider: The Lord’s Prayer Coffee Mug.

Note: All merchandise is featured for informational purposes only. No endorsement or advertising is intended or implied for any goods, services, or companies, and no compensation has been received by the author.

 

Previous April Fool’s Day posts:

The Missing Tissot Nudes

Was James Tissot a Plagiarist?

Tissot and his Friends Clown Around

Happy Hour with James Tissot

Tissot’s Tiger Skin: A Prominent Prop

James Tissot, the painter art critics love to hate

Paris, 1885-1900

©  2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).

See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

NOTE:  If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

“Berthe,” “Sunday Morning,” and “The Newspaper”

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. ““Berthe,” “Sunday Morning,” and “The Newspaper”.” The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/03/13/berthe-sunday-morning-and-the-newspaper/ <Date viewed.>

 

In March, 1883, a few months after Kathleen Newton’s death and James Tissot’s return to Paris, he mounted a large retrospective exhibition of his work that also included eight new pastels. Among them were Le Journal (The Newspaper) and Dimanche Matin (Sunday Morning). Tissot’s pastels were a critical and popular success, during a great revival of the medium that included Édouard Manet and Edgar Degas as well as Giovanni Boldini, Paul César Helleu, and Jean-Louis Forain.

Popular during the Rococo period in France during the eighteenth century, the use of pastels came to be disparaged as the mark of minor artists with frivolous, sentimental subject matter; later, due to its softness and delicacy, pastel was considered an art form suitable for women. The medium became valued for its expressive qualities after it was used with a new creativity in the mid-nineteenth century by Jean-François Millet, and then by the Impressionists during their exhibitions of the 1870s.

As Tissot worked on his La Femme à Paris (Women of Paris, 1883-85) series of fifteen large-scale oil paintings, he executed pastel portraits of numerous prominent Belle Époque parisiennes. But The Newspaper, Sunday Morning, and another pastel, Berthe, featured anonymous models in charming and memorable compositions which he reproduced as prints. Interestingly, while the La Femme à Paris pictures were a critical and popular failure, partly due to their stiff, awkward compositions, pastels seemed to free Tissot up, allowing him the spontaneity not often seen in his oils. And while the subjects of La Femme à Paris were criticized for appearing as “always the same Englishwoman,” the subjects of these three pastels are clearly chic, modern Frenchwomen.

Portrait de jeune femme.

Berthe (1883), by James Tissot. Pastel. Musée du Petit Palais, Paris. Public domain.

James Tissot, 1883, Berthe, print, RISD, 273276

Berthe (1883), by James Tissot. Etching and drypoint. Rhode Island School of Design Museum. Public domain.

In Berthe, a sweet-faced woman wearing a straw bonnet reclines on a large golden cushion atop a blue divan. Though Berthe is young, she gazes at the viewer with a direct, straightforward demeanor of independence and confidence.

Unusually Impressionistic for Tissot, this work is highly finished only in the figure’s face, hat, right hand and arm, and the magnificent bow at her throat, with a loose treatment of her lower body. Dry color in stick form, pastels were particularly suited to this sketchy style.

While Berthe was not exhibited until 1885 with La Femme à Paris, at Galerie Sedelmeyer in Paris, and in London in 1886, the etching after it is dated 1883.

This pastel is now in the collection of the Musée du Petit Palais, Paris.

The etched version is in the opposite direction of the pastel. Note how the creases of the dress across the woman’s torso are more defined in this version.

James Tissot, 1883, Sunday Morning, print, RISD, 273275

Sunday Morning (Le dimanche matin, 1883), by James Tissot. Etching and drypoint on paper. Rhode Island School of Design Museum. Public domain.

Sunday Morning (Le Dimanche matin) shows a woman, the model from Berthe, carrying a missal on her way to church. The pastel was exhibited at the Palais de l’industrie in 1883. Its current whereabouts are unknown.

 

Le Journal

The Newspaper (Le journal, 1883), by James Tissot. Pastel. Musée du Petit Palais, Paris. Public domain.

James Tissot, 1883, Le Journal, print, Clark, 1989.18

The Newspaper (Le journal, 1883), by James Tissot. Etching and drypoint. The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Public domain.

The Newspaper (Le journal, 1883) depicts a sophisticated, modern woman, keeping au courant by reading the newspaper, and wearing a stylish hat and coat and elegant pince-nez. She is older than the woman in Berthe and Sunday Morning, and projects a settled self-reliance as she immerses herself in the news. Tissot has drawn a ring on the third finger of her left hand, indicating she is married and therefore respectable. The ring may not have been visible had Tissot depicted her holding the paper in the more usual manner.

The pastel, now in the collection of the Musée du Petit Palais, Paris, was exhibited at the Palais de l’industrie in 1883 and at the Galerie Sedelmeyer in 1885, alongside Tissot’s series of fifteen large-scale paintings of various incarnations of modern parisiennes, La Femme à Paris (Women of Paris).

In the etched version, Tissot added chestnut leaves behind the woman’s head, setting her outdoors. Curiously, in the reversed composition, Tissot chose to show the woman’s wedding ring on the third finger of her right hand – a cue as to her marital status that also provides a note of visual interest between the light form of the newspaper and the dark form of the woman’s torso.

Pastels are sensitive to light and not often on public display.

Related posts:

Belle Époque Portraits in Pastel by James Tissot

James Tissot’s Prints

Tissot’s La Femme à Paris series

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

 

What happens at the Tissot Symposium…stays at the Tissot Symposium?

To cite this article: Paquette, Lucy. “What happens at the Tissot Symposium…stays at the Tissot Symposium?The Hammock. https://thehammocknovel.wordpress.com/2020/02/13/what-happens-at-the-tissot-symposium-stays-at-the-tissot-symposium/. <Date viewed.>

 

2020_02, Lucy and Melisssa, IMG_0265

Melissa Buron and Lucy Paquette

When I visited James Tissot: Fashion and Faith at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco with my husband in November, 2019, curator Melissa E. Buron spent the morning showing us through the galleries.

I’d be lying if I said I sedately strolled through these rooms, each spilling into another, all gleaming with Tissot paintings – of course I darted, mid-sentence, from picture to picture, many of which were on loan from private collections or from institutions I have not yet visited. I recall squealing rather indecorously. We talked nonstop, sharing our thoughts and experiences. Melissa and I have a kindred…well, obsession with Tissot. Over lunch, she asked me to present at the exhibition’s closing symposium, February 8-9, 2020.

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Cassandra Sciortino, Melissa Buron and Peter Trippi discussing Tissot during Scholar’s Hours in the Exhibition galleries

It was an honor to be invited to present at this symposium and to meet interesting colleagues working across a wide range of subjects related to Tissot studies.

I made new friends and enjoyed the collegial sharing of information within a larger community of “Tissotistes.”

It was 48 hours of non-stop Tissot immersion, which may sound fairly deranged, but akin to spending a whirlwind weekend at Disneyland: magical, hectic, and focused on an outsized character.

My presentation was one of eight, four on Saturday and four on Sunday, before an audience of museum members, interested professionals, and the public, in the Legion of Honor’s elegant Gunn Theater:

 

February 8, 2020, Part I: “Fashion”

2020_02, Newton sign, IMG_4818 (1)“Behind-the-Scenes: Revealing Tissot’s Paint Technique,” by Sarah Kleiner, Associate Paintings Conservator, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco

“Chicks with Guns: Tissot’s The Crack Shot and Women’s Relationship to Firearms,” by Nancy Rose Marshall, Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

“James Tissot and ‘the little class’ of the Belle Époque,” by Lucy Paquette, independent art historian

“‘The Impresario:’ Degas – or Tissot?” by Anthea Callen, a frequent expert on BBC’s Fake or Fortune?, Professor Emeritus of Art, Australian National University, Canberra, and Professor Emeritus of Visual Culture, University of Nottingham, U.K.

 

February 9, 2020, Part II: “Faith”

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The Legion of Honor’s lovely Gunn Theater

“Solving the mysteries of Kathleen Newton’s life: New findings and facts,” by Krystyna Matyjaszkiewicz, independent curator and art historian

“Scientists and Spiritualists Imaging Ghosts at the fin de siècle,” by Serena Keshavjee, Professor of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Winnipeg

“Tissot’s travelogue from the Holy Land,” by Paul Perrin, Curator of Paintings, Musée d’Orsay, Paris

“James Tissot: The Afterlife of an Exhibition,” by Melissa Buron, Director, Art Division, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco

 

The presentations were videotaped, and the Legion of Honor has posted links on YouTube: February 8, 2020, Part I: “Fashion” and February 9, 2020, Part II: “Faith”. You can view mine, “James Tissot and ‘the little class’ of the Belle Époque,” (on the link to February 8, from 1:16 to 1:46), as well as the others in these two videos, such as:

James Tissot, 1865 c, Self Portrait, IMG_6279               James Tissot, 1869 c, Melancholy, IMG_6264

  • Sarah Kleiner’s fascinating analysis, from results of a two-year international collaboration, of Tissot’s techniques and materials, and the discovery that his oils, Self-Portrait (c. 1865, above left, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco) and Melancholy (c. 1869, above right, private collection) were painted on two halves of a single panel of mahogany, whose horizontal grain is shown to align by X-radiographs. Such research is useful when dating paintings and considering attribution.
  • Anthea Callen’s meticulous exploration of a theory, originally asserted by Richard Thomson in 1988, that the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco’s oil study, The Impresario (c. 1877), is not by Edgar Degas, but James Tissot. I was sold early in her talk, when she noted that Degas did not do the type of preparatory study in oil that was so characteristic of Tissot’s work. But a side-by-side comparison of The Impresario and Tissot’s paintings, Evening (1878) and The Political Woman (c. 1883-85), was even more convincing.

2020_02, Anthea Cullen, IMG_6235

PowerPoint slide by Anthea Callen juxtaposing The Impresario (center, currently attributed to Edgar Degas) with James Tissot’s Evening (left) and The Political Woman (right). The poses of the three male figures are strikingly similar.

  • 2020_02, 465px-Palliser, credit Dreadnought Project

    Rear-Admiral H. Bury Palliser at age 56, in Navy & Army Illustrated May 15th 1896. http://www.dreadnoughtproject.org/tfs/index.php/Henry_St._Leger_Bury_Palliser

    Krystyna Matyjaszkiewicz’s exciting archival research on Kathleen Ashburnham Kelly Newton’s life, and her identification of the Naval officer who seduced her on her journey during August and September of 1870, when she was 16 years old, to marry older widower Dr. Isaac Newton in northwest India as Henry St. Leger Bury Palliser (1839–1907). Directly after the wedding, Kathleen admitted her improper relations with Palliser and found herself alone, penniless and pregnant, asking the doctor to pay for her journey back to England. 

[Palliser, often referred to as “Captain Palliser” in relation to Kathleen Newton, was appointed a Commander in the Royal Navy in 1869. He would have been 31 when he met Kathleen Kelly, who was motherless and fresh out of Gumley House Convent School in Isleworth.]

Dr. Newton divorced Kathleen, and she had her baby (her daughter, Violet Newton, December 20, 1871–December 28, 1933) at her father’s house in Conisbrough, Yorkshire, but she soon moved to London, living with her older sister around the corner from James Tissot’s St. John’s Wood villa.

 

2020_02, Paul Perrin, IMG_6496

  • 2020_02, St James head, IMG_6516

    Head of Saint James the Elder, 1886-1889, Jerusalem, Armenian Cathedral of Saint James. PowerPoint slide by Paul Perrin.

    Paul Perrin’s amazing discovery of an unknown, 60-page handwritten manuscript by James Tissot – a travelogue of his time in the Holy Land, conducting research for his Bible illustrations. A letter from a publisher in New York indicates that Tissot had plans, which never materialized, to publish his manuscript as a travel epic and guide. Paul announced his even more amazing discovery that Tissot’s travelogue led him to a formerly unattributed painting by Tissot, at The Cathedral of Saint James, a 12th-century Armenian church in Jerusalem.

2020_02, Melissa Power Point, IMG_6523

PowerPoint slide by Melissa Buron

  • Melissa’s emotional adieu to the exhibition, now on its way to Paris, where it will be on view, with some variation, from March 23 through July 19, 2020. She calls James Tissot “the most interesting artist in the 19th century that you’ve never heard of.”

 

But it’s clear that this is changing.

In 2009, when I began researching James Tissot for my book, The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, there was little popular interest in him, and only a handful of scholars were dedicated to researching his life and work. On Twitter, that barometer of cultural awareness, I was alone in posting images of James Tissot’s wonderful paintings after publishing my novel in 2012 and embarking on my blog, The Hammock, to share more about him.

Marquise de Miramon, Getty Open Content

Portrait of the Marquise de Miramon, née Thérèse Feuillant (1866), by James Tissot. Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

In 2013, Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity, curated by Gloria Groome, now Chair of European Painting and Sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago, was a revelation as an unheralded mini-exhibition of James Tissot’s most spectacular paintings. In New York, at the Met, people (including me) vied for a position close enough to examine the Musée d’Orsay’s relatively new acquisitions, Portrait of the Marquis and Marquise of Miramon and their children and The Circle of the Rue Royale, clearly reluctant to step away from these poignant, exquisite glimpses of a lost world. And yet, Tissot’s reputation was such that a reviewer for The New York Times disparaged the gorgeous Portrait of the Marquise de Miramon as “zealously detailed,” Advertising for this blockbuster exhibition barely mentioned James Tissot – why, when he had no name recognition?

Across the country, Melissa Buron reacted with the same frustration that James Tissot and his work were not receiving their full due when she witnessed the artist’s work overshadowed by his more famous countrymen. She began her efforts towards the Legion of Honor retrospective, and is on the vanguard of a new era of fascination with James Tissot, welcoming new voices and directions in research. Melissa, along with fellow curators Paul Perrin and Marine Kisiel at the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, Paris, and Cyrille Sciama, Director of Musée des impressionnismes Giverny, is bringing Tissot’s work to a wider public and redefining his place in the history of 19th century art.

2020_02, TissotPose, IMG_6363

Tissot scholars indulging in Paul Perrin’s Instagram sensation, #tissotpose

And now, with that new fascination combined with the energy of social media, rather than a few art historians viewing Tissot research as an exclusive domain, Tissot scholarship encompasses everything from a stylish new documentary film on his life and work,  James Tissot, The Ambiguous Figure of Modernity, as France reclaims its former superstar, to stunning recent discoveries of Tissot’s “lost” art, biographical information, and important documents, photographs, and letters that have been “hiding in plain sight,” to Instagram crazes like Paul Perrin’s #tissotpose – and yes, my blog on James Tissot’s life, art, associates and times.

2020_02_09, galleries, IMG_6531

Importantly, what all this accomplishes is to make James Tissot accessible. And what that accomplishes is to make him popular, when one of the greatest frustrations of Tissot scholars is that he is so much less well-known than his peers such as Edgar Degas and Édouard Manet, or the biggest marketing draw, “The Impressionists.” As museum professionals know, a popular artist makes for a well-attended exhibition, in which efforts to engage, inform, and delight a broader audience can have a much greater opportunity for success and satisfaction.

All of this would be immensely rewarding to James Tissot, who believed in himself and his art enough to decline the invitation to exhibit with the Impressionists, who saw his reputation obscured by theirs but who continued to pursue his own idiosyncratic path, knowing that his work was special, significant – and unforgettable.

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Special thanks to the following staff at the Legion of Honor:

Lexi Paulson
Administrative Coordinator to the Director, Art Division

Isabella Holland
Curatorial Assistant, European Paintings

Danny Cesena
Audio Visual Technical Coordinator

© 2020 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

The articles published on this blog are copyrighted by Lucy Paquette.  An article or any portion of it may not be reproduced in any medium or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, without the author’s permission.  You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the author. 

Related posts:

James Tissot: Fashion & Faith, a retrospective at the Legion of Honor

James Tissot, the painter art critics still love to hate: a retrospective review round-up

James Tissot, the painter art critics love to hate

A spotlight on Tissot at the Met’s “Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity”

CH377762

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).

See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.