Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Gentlemen & Rogues (1865 – 1879)

James Tissot, often described as a dandy, seems to have dressed flamboyantly as a young art student in Paris and early in his career.

Self portrait, c.1865 (oil on panel), by James Tissot. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA, USA. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in "The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot" by Lucy Paquette, © 2012.

Self portrait (c. 1865), by James Tissot.  Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA, USA. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot” by Lucy Paquette, © 2012.

After Tissot found success (in the early 1860s), he began to present himself as a gentleman of business:  he wore a frock coat, and there is no indication that he tried to compete with the stylish aristocrats he painted, even as he earned great wealth in his career.  In this image, he wears a heavy, tan overcoat with his black frock coat, a cream-colored, high-cut waistcoat, a white shirt with a stand-up collar and notched cuffs, black cuff links, and a plain black tie.

James Tissot (c. 1867-68), by Edgar Degas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

Here is Tissot a few years later, in a portrait by Edgar Degas, and while he is well-dressed, he is not wearing anything flashy or trendy.  He wears a black frock coat over a dark grey waistcoat and white shirt, with a black cravat, full-cut light grey trousers and black leather half-boots.  His black top hat and satin-lined cape are on the table behind him, as if he might be prepared for an evening at the Opera or the theater.

Whether James Tissot was a gentleman or a rogue is debatable.  He seems to have fought, however briefly, for the radical Paris Commune in the spring of 1871, before he relocated to London and soon took a young divorcée as his mistress.  Though he seems to have tried to help his struggling painter friends, he accumulated great wealth and ended up being considered a rogue by Degas as well as James Whistler and, at times, Berthe Morisot.

Chichester Parkinson-Fortescue, 1st Baron Carlingford (1823-1898), 1871, by James Tissot (Photo credit: Wikipedia.org)

By all accounts, Chichester Parkinson-Fortescue, 1st Baron Carlingford (1823-1898) was a thorough gentleman.  He was a politically ambitious Irishman and Liberal MP for County Louth from 1847 to 1868.  He became a junior lord of the treasury in 1854, and in 1863, he married the beautiful, virtuous and politically influential Society hostess Frances, Countess Waldegrave (1821 – 1879).  Fortescue held minor offices in the Liberal administrations until he was made Chief Secretary for Ireland under Lord Russell from 1865 through 1866, and again under Gladstone from 1868 to 1870. From 1871 to 1874, Chichester Fortescue was President of the Board of Trade.

He was described as pedantic but with a fine intellect.  In 1853-54, when Fortescue was a bachelor, John Ruskin often left him alone with his young wife Effie, whom he admired and who apparently confided in him.  Fortescue would spend a decade in love with Lady Waldegrave before her elderly husband died; she chose him out of the three or four men who wished to marry her.  They were very happy together, as he helped her become more educated, and she used her fortune, charm, and hospitality to further his career.  Queen Victoria invited the couple to dine with her at Windsor; she enjoyed Lady Waldegrave’s vivacity and appreciated Fortescue’s pleasant and agreeable manner and gentle voice.  He was a diffident man who detested all card games and could only relax in the company of Bohemian types like Edward Lear.

In 1871 Tissot painted Fortescue wearing a black frock coat and full-cut fawn-colored trousers with an elegant white shawl-colored waistcoat, a white shirt with a stand-up collar, and a black tie folded over in a single, loose knot accented with a pearl tie tack.  His black leather half-boots shine.

Gentleman in a Railway Carriage (1872), by James Tissot. The Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, U.S.A. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

This elegant man of business, with his neatly trimmed mustache and beard, spares us a glance as he checks his pocket watch.  He is dressed in the latest fashion – a lounge suit:  his sack coat, waistcoat, and trousers all are cut from the same fabric.  This style was introduced in the 1860s for comfort in the domestic sphere; Tissot’s painting shows that by this date, it was appropriate to wear it in public.  The light brown wool is a confident choice that would have set this gentleman apart from the sea of colleagues in black frock coats and also makes the top-stitched edging stand out.  His crimson tie and commodious fur-trimmed black overcoat are further evidence that he is a flashy and very successful, individual.  Imagine what a figure he’ll cut when he alights from the carriage, wearing the black top hat now at his side, and those white kid gloves, perhaps with the boiled wool blanket folded over his arm as he continues to his destination.

On the Thames (1876), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas; 28.5 by 46.5 in. (72.5 by 118 cm). Hepworth Wakefield Art Gallery, Wakefield, UK. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot” by Lucy Paquette, © 2012.

On the Thames (1876), by James Tissot. Hepworth Wakefield Art Gallery, Wakefield, UK. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot” by Lucy Paquette, © 2012.

The Victorians immediately decided this image of a handsome man on an outing with two beautiful women was “More French, shall we say, than English?”  Unless the women are the sisters of this junior officer, we might be right to guess that carting them off with a picnic hamper and three bottles of champagne makes him a rogue.  He is not in uniform, but wears his black-and-gold naval cap with a loose, thigh-length, single-breasted black wool coat that has wide lapels and upper sleeves, and side vents.  He sports off-white trousers with loosely turned-up cuffs, blue socks, and laced, tan-and-white leather spectator shoes with a low heel.  Incidentally, Tissot featured the exact same shoes in The Return from the Boating Trip (1873), The Ball on Shipboard (c. 1874), Quarreling (c. 1874-75), and Holyday (c. 1876).  Perhaps they were studio props, and certainly they are of more visual interest than the plain black half-boots popular with men at that time.

Algernon Moses Marsden (1877), by James Tissot. Private collection. (Photo credit: Wikimedia.org)

Algernon Moses Marsden (1847 – 1920) was no gentleman.

His father, Isaac Moses (1809 – 1884), owned the Ready-Made Clothing Emporium at Aldgate, and by the time Algernon was 10 years old, the family lived in a grand new house at 23 Kensington Palace Gardens with a bow-fronted ballroom at the back.  At 24, Algernon married, but rather than join the family business, he established himself as a picture dealer in St. James’s.  In an 1872 trade directory, his residence is listed as Bayswater, a suburb west of London.  He may have sold Tissot’s In the Conservatory (Rivals, c. 1875) [see For sale: In the Conservatory (Rivals), c. 1875, by James Tissot], and Marguerite in Church (c. 1860) around 1876, the year he sold William Holman Hunt’s 1866 Il Dolce far Niente through Christie’s, London.

Algernon Marsden lived high and went bankrupt by the age of 34; his debts were settled by his father.  Algernon and his wife now resided in Kensington with five young daughters, plus Algernon’s 23-year-old niece, and five servants.  When his father died in 1884, he disinherited Algernon in his Will but provided legacies for his wife and children.

In bankruptcy court again in 1887, at 40, Algernon said that when money came in, he “got rid of it” by gambling, particularly at the racetrack, but also at Eastbourne, a fashionable resort.  By age 44, he, his wife, nine daughters and one son had moved to South Kensington.  Bankrupt for at least the third time, Algernon, at age 54, abandoned his wife and ten children and fled to the United States with another woman in 1901.  In 1912, The Times of London reported that Algernon Moses Marsden was bankrupt, but he was living in New York, where he died at the age of 72 on January 23, 1920.

Tissot captured this consummate rogue at age 30, wearing an embellished smoking jacket, a crisp, wing-collared white shirt, and a shining gold ring on his left hand.

The Rivals (I rivali, 1878–79), by James Tissot. Private collection.

There’s no telling if these gentlemen are rogues.  Tissot’s The Rivals (I rivali, 1878–79) is set in the conservatory of his home in St. John’s Wood, London.  It casts his mistress, Kathleen Newton, as a young widow, crocheting while taking tea with two suitors, one middle-aged and one old.  The haughty-looking younger man wears a black sack coat over a white shirt with a stand-up collar, a dark tie, and fawn-colored trousers.  The older man, still wearing his gloves, leans forward earnestly in his fully-buttoned, double-breasted black sack coat.  Perhaps due his girth, his white waistcoat lines the coat rather awkwardly.  His dark blue tie is quite wide, and he wears dark grey trousers and an oddly dainty white boutonnière.  Incidentally, while most men of this era simply folded their ties over in a single, loose knot, this man has fastened his with a four-in-hand knot.

The Terrace of the Trafalgar Tavern, Greenwich, London, by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikiart.org)

We can’t suppose these two men are rogues, just because they seem ungentlemanly enough not to interact with the two women in their party.  As usual, Tissot depicts an enigmatic situation:  these individuals all are waiting for something.  The man with the white whiskers and extraordinary matching eyebrows wears a tall grey top hat with a wide black band, which is echoed by his black cravat.  He pairs his black frock coat with tan trousers and brown kid gloves.  The other man appears to be wearing a black sack coat over his tan trousers.  He wears neither hat nor gloves, and shows a bit of an attitude, the way he sits astride the carved chair.  Perhaps the two young women are content, not having to converse with the stuffy gentleman nor the unconventional one!  Note that Tissot painted this image in 1878, and the lounge suit is not yet so common that either of his male subjects wears it.

Going to Business (c. 1879), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

In this painting, the elderly, wealthy businessman is dressed conservatively in a black frock coat with a starched white shirt front, black cravat, and a black top hat.  Victorian viewers snickered that he was off to visit his mistress.  Gentleman or rogue?

Related posts:

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Aristocrats (1865 – 1868)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Officers, soldiers & sailors (1868 – 1883/85)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: The Casual Male (1871 – 1878)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Sportsmen & Servants (1874 – 1885)

©  2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Sportsmen & Servants (1874 – 1885)

Not every man that Tissot painted was an exemplar of high style; he depicted a whole cast of supporting players to his aristocrats, military figures, and fashionable males.

Still on Top (c. 1874), by James Tissot. Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, New Zealand. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

The elderly male servant in Still on Top (c. 1874) wears a red liberty cap, a revolutionary symbol in France.  Tissot painted this scene only three years after he had fled Paris – under some suspicion – during the French government’s suppression of the radical Paris Commune.  It was a daring picture for an apparent French political refugee of the time, remaking his career in England.  One has to wonder if many English servants of the day wore this style cap – or if its appearance in this work is a painterly conceit of Tissot’s.  The man’s ensemble seems contrived to blend with the flags before him – his red shirt, blue long-sleeved sweater, and white canvas coveralls.  And yet, because Tissot’s habit was faithfully to record the fashions of the time, we can infer the essential accuracy of the type of clothes this man would wear – i.e. the coveralls and the black leather boots with a medium heel.

Sur la Tamise, (Return from Henley, also known as On the Thames, c. 1874), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikipaintings.org)

These hardy men wear what we now call Henley shirts – a collarless, pullover shirt with a placket, the traditional uniform of rowers in the town of Henley-on-Thames.  Their caps have black, blue and white stripes.  Both the shirts and the trousers would have been cotton at this time.

Holyday (c. 1876), by James Tissot. Tate Britain, London.. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

The cricketers in Holyday (c. 1876), in their black, red, and gold caps, are members of the famous I Zingari cricket club (which still exists, and is one of the oldest amateur cricket clubs), which played at Lord’s Cricket Ground near Tissot’s house at 17 Grove End Road, St John’s Wood, London.  Incidentally, the cap colors are based on the motto, “Out of darkness, through fire, into light,” and the gold is always at the top.  The men wear buff-colored lounge suits – sack coats paired with trousers cut from the same fabric, considered a casual look.  The young man reclining by the ornamental pool has a red carnation boutonnière, and a large ivory-colored scarf loosely knotted at the neck of his white shirt.  He wears tan and white laced spectator shoes with a low heel, just like the ones worn by the men Tissot painted in The Return from the Boating Trip (1873) and Quarreling (c. 1874-75) [see Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: The Casual Male (1871 – 1878)].

The Warrior’s Daughter (A Convalescent, c. 1878), by James Tissot. Manchester Art Gallery, U.K. (Photo: Wikiart.org).

In The Warrior’s Daughter (A Convalescent, c. 1878, the servant pushing the wealthy, ailing gent in the bath chair is, in classic supporting player fashion, dressed to recede behind the painting’s stars.  The servant’s rumpled brown coat, waistcoat, and trousers are relieved only by a white-spotted black scarf at his throat, and his unusually high-crowned brown hat with its wide maroon band halfway up.  Also somewhat incongruous is the high polish on his black leather shoes.

The Letter (c. 1878), by James Tissot. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

The elegant manservant in the background of The Letter (c. 1878) wears livery of a black morning coat over a white shirt with a high, stand-up collar and a white tie.  His tight black knee breeches blend into his black stockings and black leather shoes, which have no heels – surely allowing discreet attendance.

The Ferry (c. 1879), by James TIssot. Private Collection.

In The Ferry (. 1879), Tissot contrasts the middle-class gentleman with the ferryman.  The passenger is hunched under an umbrella in his black bowler hat, black sack coat, pristine white shirt with a stand-up collar, and a tie, kid gloves and trousers in a matching light brown hue, along with black leather shoes and white spats.  The supremely capable ferryman steers with glove-less hands and stays warm in his heavy black wool pea coat and dark woolen trousers.  He has a natty white-and-black checked scarf at his throat and a Russian fur ushanka hat with the flaps tied up.  Incidentally, Tissot’s subversive streak is evident in this painting, as few painters of the time depicted members of the middle-class as less competent than an individual below them on the social scale.

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover (also known as Amateur Circus, 1885), by James Tissot. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. (Photo: Wikipaintings.org)

The setting for Women of Paris: The Circus Lover (also known as Les femmes de sport, 1885) is the Molier Circus in Paris, a “high-life circus” in which the amateur performers were members of the aristocracy.  The man on the trapeze wearing red is the Duc de la Rochefoucauld, one of the oldest titles of the French nobility; he was said to have “the biceps of Hercules.”  Both the Duc and the man on the other trapeze wear flesh-colored leotards covering their chests, arms and legs, with brightly-colored athletic costumes, black leather belts, and colorful, laced leather athletic shoes without heels.

People of beauty and fashion attended the circus and mingled with the performers during the interval; note that the men in the audience wear gleaming silk top hats and morning coats over white shirts with stand-up collars.

Tissot’s work depicts the dress of a broad array of characters in the drama of his era, providing us with a window into his world.

Related posts:

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Aristocrats (1865 – 1868)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Officers, soldiers & sailors (1868 – 1883/85)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: The Casual Male (1871 – 1878)

©  2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: The Casual Male (1871 – 1878)

By the 1870s, fashions for Victorian men were transitioning toward styles familiar to us today.  The ubiquitous, long and skirted black frock coat, and the morning coat (cut away to feature tails only), while still very much de rigueur for business, gradually were being supplanted by trendy styles.  The sack coat (a loosely-cut, thigh-length coat with no waist seam) and the lounge suit (in which the sack coat and trousers were cut from the same fabric), would become the men’s business suit of our modern age.   Ankle boots and laced shoes had been replacing full boots since 1850.  And in this decade, the straw boater hat was adopted by rowing enthusiasts for summer – as depicted by Impressionist painters in France.

The elegant gentlemen of the 1870s incorporated the latest styles in dressing for leisure time, and Tissot captured these trends in his paintings.

Autumn on the Thames, Nuneham Courtney (c. 1871-72), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

In Autumn on the Thames, Nuneham Courtney (c. 1871-72), the gentleman’s suit coat is deep blue, and we can see from his cuffs that he wears a crisp white shirt under it, accented with a black tie.  His straw boater seems slightly crumpled, but his ginger whiskers are so immaculately groomed as to be impervious to the strong breeze.

The Return from the Boating Trip (1873), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikipaintings.org)

The dapper gentleman in The Return from the Boating Trip (1873), with his notable ginger whiskers and walrus mustache, is prepared for varying weather.  He wears a short, loosely fitted, double-breasted charcoal grey coat – really, a sailor’s pea coat – and carries a black overcoat on his arm.  Under the pea coat, the hem of a blue sack coat is apparent.  The man’s bright white trousers have a generous, loosely turned-up cuff, and they show off his summery laced-up spectator shoes of white and tan leather.  The white scarf neatly folded at his neck echoes his trousers, and under the scarf, his blue- and white-striped Breton shirt is visible.  His ivory-colored straw boater has a bright blue and red ribbon band.  He, like his companion, is dressed to perfection for this outing.

Quarreling (c. 1874-75), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikiart.org)

The unapologetic young man in Quarreling (c. 1874-75) wears a loosely-cut beige lounge suit that nicely sets off his flamboyant tan and white leather spectator shoes.  His white shirt collar is quite high, drawing the eye to his straw boater with its black band.  It was in the 1870s that it became acceptable to wear the lounge suit outside one’s domestic environment.

A Passing Storm (c. 1876), by James Tissot. Beaverbrook Art Gallery, New Brunswick. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

The young man in A Passing Storm (c. 1876), also shown after a quarrel with a woman, seems troubled, with his straw boater pushed back off his forehead.  He looks elegant in his black lounge suit, under which he wears a white shirt with a stand-up collar paired with a dark brown tie, and a low cut, ivory-colored waistcoat with a shawl collar.

By the Thames at Richmond (c. 1878), by James Tissot. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

And, finally, in By the Thames at Richmond (c. 1878), a fashion “Don’t”:  hunched over in his misshapen brown hat, wrinkled brown suit, and over-sized white spats covering his dusty black leather shoes, this man hardly cuts a striking figure.

However, the smart gentleman reader will note that the woman he is with gazes at him in adoration nonetheless – as he writes “I love you” with his walking stick in the ground at her feet.

Clothes are not always the measure of a man!

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Aristocrats (1865 – 1868)

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Officers, soldiers & sailors (1868 – 1883/85)

©  2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Officers, soldiers & sailors (1868 – 1883/85)

“Our industrial and artistic creations can perish, our morals and our fashions can fall into obscurity, but a picture by M. Tissot will be enough for archaeologists of the future to reconstitute our epoch.”

~ L’Artiste, 1869, in a review of Tissot’s painting, Young Ladies Looking at Japanese Objects, exhibited at the Paris Salon

It was not just women’s fashions that James Tissot painted with the precision of a photojournalist recording the sights around him; he also recorded military men in detail, giving us a glimpse of life in his time.

Beating the Retreat in the Tuileries Gardens (1867), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikipaintings.org)

This painting, which Tissot exhibited at the Salon in 1868, features four Imperial Guardsmen:  three Hussars and a Zouave.

In 1830, numerous members of the fierce Kabyli tribe of Zouaoua living in the rocky hills of Algeria and Morocco volunteered to fight with the French colonial army.  In 1852, Napoléon III, Emperor of the French, ordered the Zouaves – by that time native Frenchmen stationed in Algeria – restructured into three regiments of the regular French Army.  The Zouave regiments served in The Crimean War (1853 – 1856).  On December 23, 1854, the Emperor created a fourth regiment, the Zouaves of the Imperial Guard; detachments from the Zouave regiments serving in the Crimea were brought together on March 15, 1855 to form it.  They were based at Saint-Cloud until 1857, and subsequently at Versailles.  The Zouaves of the Imperial Guard served through all the campaigns of the Second Empire, including the Franco-Austrian War of 1859 and the Mexican Intervention (1864-66).

The Zouaves earned a reputation for reckless bravery, and they became famous for their distinctive uniforms, which included a short, collarless, open-fronted jacket, baggy trousers, sashes and Oriental head gear, modelled on Algerian native dress.  The Zouave drummer in Tissot’s painting wears a blue uniform with gold trim, leggings, a white turban with a golden tassel, and white spats over his black leather shoes.

The Hussars, in their smartly-tailored blue, red and gold uniforms, are possibly from the 9th Hussar Regiment, formed in 1852 as the régiment des guides.  In 1854, it became the régiment des guides de la Garde Impériale.

Frederick Burnaby (1870), by James Tissot. National Portrait Gallery, London. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

Tissot painted this portrait of Frederick Gustavus (“Gus”) Burnaby (1842-1885) sometime between the autumn of 1869 and the summer of 1870.  Burnaby, a captain in the Royal Horse Guards (3rd Household Cavalry, “the Blues”), was 27 or 28 years old and mingled with the Prince of Wales’ social set.

He is shown off duty, smoking and conversing in his “undress” uniform of a dark blue coat with a standing collar, scarlet and gold trimmings, a white cross-belt, and long blue trousers with red stripes sewn along the outer seams.  He wears highly polished black leather shoes, and his military cap is beside him.  Behind him, his full-dress uniform is laid out:  a plumed silver-gilt helmet, frogged cape, polished metal cuirass (breastplate), and thigh-high black riding boots.

The Empress Eugénie and the Prince Impérial in the Grounds at Camden Place, Chislehurst (c. 1874), by James Tissot. Musée Nationale du Château de Compiègne, France. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

The Empress Eugénie and the Prince Impérial in the Grounds at Camden Place, Chislehurst (c. 1874) depicts the exiled French Empress, living outside London after the collapse of the Second Empire, and her son, Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (1856-1879), the Prince Impérial.  The only child of Napoléon III of France, he was accepted to the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, in 1872 and is pictured in the uniform of a Woolwich cadet.  He wears a jacket with a standing collar, trimmed in red and gold with a single row of brass buttons, long trousers, and a round cap with a gold band.

Upon his father’s death in January, 1873, Bonapartists proclaimed him Napoléon IV.  When the Prince turned 18 in 1874, thousands of French citizens traveled to fête him in Chislehurst:  the railway station flew the tricolour of France, while in the main waiting room an inscription, wreathed in laurels and violets, read, “Vive le Prince Impérial 16 mars, 1874.”  He made a speech to rapturous crowds.

The Prince Impérial proved himself an excellent student at Woolwich – seventh in a class of thirty-four – and graduated in early 1875.

In The Gentleman Cadet: His Career and Adventures at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich:  a Tale of the Past (1875), Alfred Wilks Drayson (I827-1901) recalled, “It was ten days after joining the Academy that I first obtained my uniform, and I can recall even now the secret pride with which I first put it on.  I felt now that I really had commenced the career of a soldier…There seemed to come upon me a feeling of responsibility as the coat came on me, and I made up my mind not to disgrace my cloth.”

Louis-Napoléon became friends with members of the British Royal Family, especially with the Prince of Wales.  He was advised not to join the regular service of the British Government, and therefore was not commissioned as an officer.  He was killed in 1879, at age 23, in the Zulu War.

Reading the News (c. 1874), by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

Reading the News (c. 1874) is an enigmatic painting featuring a lovely woman wearing a yachting costume, at a tea table with a Chelsea pensioner in his navy blue “undress,” or casual uniform.  What is a Chelsea pensioner?  He (or, since 2009 – she) is one of about 300 residents at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, a retirement home and nursing home for former members of the British Army located on Royal Hospital Road in west London.  They surrender their army pension and live within the Royal Hospital, free of financial worries while enjoying comradeship, full medical care and catering services, and a wide range of activities including charitable causes.  Chelsea pensioners may come and go from the Royal Hospital as they please, and they are permitted to wear civilian clothing when they travel.  But within the Hospital, and in the surrounding area, they wear the blue uniform (the RH on the man’s hat is for Royal Hospital).  For ceremonial occasions, they wear distinctive scarlet coats and black tricorne hats.

The Gallery of HMS Calcutta (Portsmouth), c. 1876, by James Tissot. Tate, London. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

Though the male in this painting is a minor character who could have been any man from a dandy in a lounge suit to an older figure in a frock coat, Tissot lends added interest to The Gallery of HMS Calcutta (Portsmouth) by depicting him as a low-ranking naval officer.  Looking rather off-duty here, the young ensign slouches over the rail with his cap pushed back – considering the company on this hot summer day, perhaps his brow is sweaty?

Sans dot (Without a Dowry, 1883-85), by James Tissot. [One of a series of fifteen large-scale pictures called La Femme à Paris (The Parisian Woman).] Private Collection. (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

In the top left corner of Sans dot (Without a Dowry), Tissot painted two handsome French officers – for interest, and as possible objects of a new romance for the beautiful young widow in the foreground.

Over a dozen years after the fall of the Second Empire, these officers wear finely-tailored uniforms reminiscent of Captain Burnaby’s from 1870.  The officer on the left wears a double-breasted blue coat with a red- and gold-trimmed standing collar, button-down shoulder straps, triple rows of brass buttons, and red cuffs with gold embroidery.  Under this, he wears a high-collared white shirt.  His long blue trousers have a red stripe down the outer seams, and his blue képi (cap) has a dark blue band and a black leather visor.  He wears pristine white gloves.

The officer on the right wears a blue coat with a high red collar and red cuffs with gold embroidery.  In the back, its double vent is embellished with brass buttons.  His high-collared white shirt peeks out as well.  His long red trousers have a blue stripe sewn down the outer seams.  His red képi has a blue band, and he also wears white gloves – along with pincenez.  The gold braid trim on the shoulders of his coat indicates his higher rank.

In these paintings, Tissot painted a brief survey of military men of his era, from a young cadet to a retired member of the British army, from snappy officers to slouching ensigns, and from the exotic to the everyday.

Related post:

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Aristocrats (1865 – 1868)

©  2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

 

Masculine Fashion, by James Tissot: Aristocrats (1865 – 1868)

James Tissot, the son of a draper and a hat manufacturer, was so skilled a painter of women’s fashions that he receives little notice for his depictions of men’s fashions.

The Marquis and the Marquise de Miramon and their Children (1865), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 69 11/16 by 85 7/16 in. (177 by 217 cm). Musée d’Orsay, Paris (Photo credit: Wikimedia.org)

In The Marquis and the Marchioness of Miramon and their children, René de Cassagne de Beaufort, marquis de Miramon (1835 – 1882) and his wife, née Thérèse Feuillant (1836 – 1912), pose with their first two children, Geneviève (1863 – 1924) and Léon (1861 – 1884) on the terrace of the château de Paulhac in Auvergne.

IMG_2606 Marquis de MiramonThe Marquis is elegant and at his ease in loosely-cut sack coat with sloping shoulders and balloon sleeves (cut very wide at the elbows and narrowing at the shoulder and cuff) that were influenced by the Oriental vogue.  His left lapel is accented with the ultimate sartorial touch — a rose, this one in a delicate pink.

The fact that his riding breeches are cut from the same grey fabric as the coat was a novelty, considered appropriate only in domestic settings – amounting to a sporty lounge suit.  His tall leather riding boots, with their marvelous row of spherical buttons, echo the spherical cuff link on his left wrist.

His white linen or cotton shirt has a turnover collar, and his deep blue patterned silk necktie is tied in a loose knot and appears to be fastened with a pearl stickpin.  His light-colored, collarless waistcoat is cut high at the top and straight across the bottom, adorned with a gold watch chain.  The informal dress and poses of his subjects, along with the outdoor setting, gave Tissot’s family portrait a British flair that was quite modern at the time.

At the same time, the Marquis de Miramon epitomizes Baudelaire’s 1863 theory of true dandyism as representing “perfection in dress” and “the best way to appear distinguished.”  The accomplished gentleman was always dressed correctly for any occasion, public or private.

IMG_2603, LéonThe Marquis’ son, Léon, at four, also is perfectly turned out, though more flamboyant.  He wears a lace-trimmed white shirt, and his buff-colored coat and matching waistcoat are adorned with black scrollwork (soutache) embroidery, fashionable in the mid-1860s (and similar to that worn by the central figure in Monet’s monumental 1866 painting, Women in the Garden).  He would be out of skirts, and wearing a jacket and trousers, by the time he reached age 5 or 6.  Léon’s black leather shoes, paired with black and grey diced Scottish kilt hose, sport silver buckles.  On his chair, his low-crowned straw helmet, its color an exact match with his coat and waistcoat, is made splendid by a black velvet ribbon band and rosette with a bejeweled silver ornament.

Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1867), by James Tissot. 27 by 15 in. (68.58 by 38.10 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Lucy Paquette.

Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1867), by James Tissot. 27 by 15 in. (68.58 by 38.10 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Lucy Paquette.

In 1867, Tissot painted 43-year-old Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1824 –1896), the president of the exclusive Jockey Club in Paris.  Married in 1853, Eugène Aimé Nicolas Coppens de Fontenay had three children.

In this distinctive portrait, he is wearing wearing a white shirt with a turnover collar and a bright blue necktie.  His black sack coat has sloping shoulders and is paired with a high-cut, collarless waistcoat in pristine white.

Fontenay carries a top hat, tan kid gloves, and a walking stick, proper accouterments for day wear.  His trousers, in a brown fabric contrasting with his coat, are slim-fitting and have a substantial break.  He wears black leather ankle boots (probably with elastic sides) and, like the Marquis de Miramon, sports a dapper waxed mustache.

The Jockey Club began as a meeting place for members of the Society for the Encouragement of Horse Racing in France, founded in November 1833 by fourteen Anglophiles under the age of 30, who were aristocrats or the scions of financiers and horse breeders.  The Jockey Club was founded in June 1834, in luxurious, wood-paneled quarters on the corner of rue Grange-Batelière, just north of the intersection between Boulevard Haussmann, Boulevard des Italiens, and Boulevard Poissonnière.  All fashionable men aspired to belong to this bastion of male extravagance.  By 1864, it had 650 titled and wealthy members, who voted with white or black balls; six white balls were required for admission.

The Circle of the Rue Royale (1868), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 68 7/8 by 110 5/8 in. (175 by 281 cm). Musée d’Orsay, Paris. (Photo credit: Wikimedia.org)

In 1868, Tissot painted a dozen of the most fashionable men in Paris in a group portrait, The Circle of the Rue Royale (1868).  Members of this exclusive club, founded in 1852, each paid Tissot a sitting fee of 1,000 francs.  He portrayed them on a balcony of the Hôtel de Coislin overlooking the Place de la Concorde (if you look closely at the original painting, you can see the horse traffic through the balustrade).  From left to right: Count Alfred de la Tour Maubourg (1834-1891), Marquis Alfred du Lau d’Allemans (1833-1919), Count Étienne de Ganay (1833-1903), Captain Coleraine Vansittart (1833-1886), Marquis René de Miramon (1835-1882), Count Julien de Rochechouart (1828-1897), Baron Rodolphe Hottinguer (1835-1920; he kept the painting according to the agreed-upon drawing of lots), Marquis Charles-Alexandre de Ganay *(1803-1881), Baron Gaston de Saint-Maurice (1831-1905), Prince Edmond de Polignac (1834-1901), Marquis Gaston de Galliffet (1830-1909) and Charles Haas (1833-1902).

IMG_2655, Count Alfred de La Tour MaubourgSeated on the balustrade, Count Alfred de La Tour Maubourg, at age 34, wears a black sack coat with only the top button fastened, in what was called “English” or “Richmond-style” buttoning.  He wears it over loose, light-grey trousers, a white waistcoat over a white shirt with a turnover collar, and a blue cravat.

 

IMG_2654, Marquis Alfred du Lau d’AllemansLounging next to him, the Marquis Alfred du Lau d’Allemans, age 35, wears a black sack coat over loose, dark-grey trousers, a white shirt with a turnover collar, and a black patterned cravat, while showing off his high-cut golden silk waistcoat.

 

IMG_2651, Count Étienne de GanayCount Étienne de Ganay, in the black silk top hat, is more formally dressed in a morning suit with a high stand-up shirt collar under his tan overcoat.  His low-cut, shawl-collared waistcoat displays his pristine white shirt, with its tight-fitting, stand-up collar.  At 35, he wears a golden watch chain, and he carries a cane, as if soon to depart on business.  He has an extraordinary combination of a blonde handlebar mustache and prodigious brown whiskers.

IMG_2647, Count Julien de RochechouartCount Julien de Rochechouart, age 40, is seated, with a cigarette in his right hand.  His stylish black and white hounds tooth trousers echo the colors of the Dalmatian at his feet, while the solid black of his buttoned frock coat is relieved by his casually fluffed white pocket square – and his massive ginger beard.  His black leather ankle boots have a high polish.

IMG_2649, Captain Coleraine VansittartCaptain Coleraine Vansittart, standing behind him with slicked-down hair, was British.  He sports a brown sack coat buttoned Richmond-style and cut sharply away from the top button to show a considerable amount of the matching waistcoat.  At 35, he pairs these items with grey trousers and a white shirt with a high, starched, stand-up collar.  He seems to be wearing a white necktie.  His pose, with his left hand tucked into his pocket, exposes the black-and-white gingham lining of the coat.

IMG_2646, Marquis René de MiramonMarquis René de Miramon, age 33, is seated on the sofa, wearing a black silk top hat and holding tan gloves and an umbrella.  Dressed more formally than in his 1865 family portrait, he wears his black morning coat with light-grey trousers and black leather ankle boots.  Peeking out under his white turnover collar is a bright blue necktie.

 

IMG_2643, Baron Rodolphe HottinguerBaron Rodolphe Hottinguer, a banking heir who at 33 won the right to keep the painting of the group, sits on the other side of the sofa.  In contrast to his notable ginger-colored hair and impressive mutton-chop sideburns, he is quietly dressed in a black frock coat paired with a collared, high-cut black vest and light-grey trousers.  He has neatly folded and tied a dark-colored square scarf over his stand-up white shirt collar

IMG_2639, Marquis Charles-Alexandre de GanayMarquis Charles-Alexandre de Ganay * sits in profile in a beautifully-carved chair, showing off the brown spats buttoned over his black ankle boots.  Elegantly at his ease, he wears a black morning coat and blue, red and black plaid trousers with a white turnover collar and a light-grey patterned necktie.

[Note:  The Musée d’Orsay identifies this figure simply as Marquis de Ganay, though other sources identify him as Marquis Charles-Alexandre de Ganay (18031881), who was the father of the third sitter from the left, Count Étienne de Ganay (1833-1903).  It is not possible that the young blonde man seated in the center of Tissot’s portrait is 65 years old.]

IMG_2642, Baron Gaston de Saint-MauriceBaron Gaston de Saint-Maurice, age 37, is seated on the arm of the sofa, wearing a black silk top hat.  His black frock coat is buttoned over his high-cut white waistcoat, and the white slashes are echoed in the tidy white silk square folded into his breast pocket.  His bright blue necktie is fastened with a pearl stickpin, and he wears dark grey trousers.

IMG_2636, Prince Edmond de PolignacPrince Edmond de Polignac, at 34, lounges dreamily in the upholstered armchair, his left forefinger holding a place in his book about Louis XVII.  His flamboyant, black-and-white patterned trousers are in high style.  He wears a black morning coat, a high-cut white waistcoat with a shawl collar, and a blue necktie which may be fastened with a pearl stickpin.  He also appears to have white or grey pearl cuff links.  His grey top hat, grey gloves, and cane are stowed beneath him.

IMG_2638, Marquis Gaston de GalliffetMarquis Gaston de Galliffet, greying at the temples at 38, wears a black sack coat over slim-fitting black trousers cut from the same fabric – a sporty, fashion-forward lounge suit.  He pairs a blue-patterned necktie with his turnover shirt collar.  Is that his extinguished cigar, crushed on the floor to the left of his black leather ankle boots?  In three years, Galliffet would become known as “le marquis aux talons rouges” [Marquis Red Heels] for his brutal executions of Communards in Paris.  This was a clever reference to both his brutality in glorying in the blood of his victims as well as Galliffet’s dandyism – perhaps outré – since showy red heels had been a male fashion trend from at least 1697 to 1785, but not since.

Louis XIV (The Sun King, who ruled France from 1643 until his death in 1715) declared that only those in the royal favor were allowed the privilege of having red heels on their shoes, and by Marie Antoinette’s time, red heels had become a hated symbol of the monarchy.  British historian Philip Mansel observed that the bright heels indicated nobles did not dirty their shoes – but were “always ready to crush the enemies of the state at their feet.”  [See Louis XIV’s 1701 portrait by Hyacinthe Rigaud, which features the red-heeled shoes.]

IMG_2631, Charles HaasCharles Haas, age 35, stands, framed in the high doorway with his cane held jauntily over his right shoulder.  He wears a tan coat over his brown sack coat and matching brown, high-cut waistcoat, with finely-checked light-grey trousers.  He sports brown spats buttoned over his black leather ankle boots, and he is wearing tan kid gloves.  He has loosened the high, starched, winged stand-up collar on his white shirt, and he wears a bright blue necktie fastened with a pearl stickpin.  The fluffed pocket square in the breast pocket of his sack coat lends another white note.

Haas, a Jewish art collector and critic, was one of the models for Proust’s character, Charles Swann, in In Search of Lost Time (1913).  Haas had been blackballed from the Jockey Club four times until his heroism during the Franco-Prussian War earned his entry.  He was the lover, and later the friend, of Sarah Bernhardt.  Haas’ gleaming, flared, light-grey silk top hat was custom-made for him by Delion, who made it for only a half-dozen other elite clients.

Related posts:

The high life, 1868: Tissot, his villa & The Circle of the Rue Royale

A spotlight on Tissot at the Met’s “Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity”

©  2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

 

Oil paintings by James Tissot registered with the Nazi Era Provenance Internet Portal (NEPIP)

As of January, 2015, there are twenty-six oil paintings by James Tissot in public art collections in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, and seventeen of them are registered with the Nazi Era Provenance Internet Portal (NEPIP).

The Nazi Era Provenance Internet Portal (NEPIP) at http://www.nepip.org/ provides a searchable online registry of objects in U.S. museum collections that changed hands in Continental Europe during the Nazi era (1933-1945).  NEPIP is a single point of contact to 175 U.S. museums whose staff have come to recognize, since the late 1990s, that objects looted, seized, and illegally sold during the Nazi era may have made their way into U.S. museum collections in the decades since the war.  NEPIP was established in 2006 by the American Alliance of Museums in Arlington, Virginia; its website is http://www.aam-us.org/.

NEPIP contains information only about objects that:

  • were created before 1946 and acquired after 1932,
  • underwent a change of ownership between 1932 and 1946, and
  • were or might reasonably be thought to have been in Continental Europe between those dates.

An object’s inclusion on NEPIP does not indicate that the works are suspect, but that its provenance during the Nazi era is unclear or not yet fully documented.

The seventeen Tissot oils registered with the NEPIP from public collections worldwide are listed below with images and the information on the provenance, or history of ownership, that is known.

Promenade on the Ramparts (1864)

Tissot’s Promenade on the Ramparts (1864) [oil on board; 52 by 44.4 cm] was gifted to Stanford University in California in 1968, by petroleum geologist Robert Sumpf (1917 – 1994), who had earned his B.S. in geology there in 1941.

 

Gentleman in a Railway Carriage

Gentleman in a Railway Carriage (1872)

Tissot’s 1872 image of the modern commuter, Gentleman in a Railway Carriage [24 15/16 by 16 15/16 in./63.30 by 43.00 cm], was purchased for The Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts by the Alexander and Caroline Murdock de Witt Fund in 1965.

 

 

 

London Visitors

London Visitors (c. 1874)

Tissot exhibited London Visitors (c. 1874) [63 by 44.9 in./160 by 114 cm] at the Royal Academy in 1874.

The painting once had been in the collections of Mrs. Bannister; M. Bernard, London; and Robert Frank, London, and it was exhibited in 1937 at the Leicester Galleries in London.

In 1951, London Visitors was acquired by the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.

 

Hide and Seek

Hide and Seek (1877)

Hide and Seek (1877) was sold at Christie’s, London in 1957 for $ 2,379 USD/£ 850 GBP, then at Sotheby’s, London in 1963 for $ 6,159 USD/£ 2,200 GBP.  Mrs. C. Behr, London, owned it until at least 1967, after which it belonged to Julian Spiro, Esq.  In 1976, Christie’s, London sold the painting for $ 33,002 USD/£ 20,000 GBP.  Two years later, Hide and Seek was purchased from the Herman Shickman Gallery in New York with the Chester Dale Fund by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

 

July (Speciman of a Portrait

July (Speciman of a Portrait, 1878)

Tissot exhibited July (Speciman of a Portrait) along with nine other paintings at London’s Grosvenor Gallery in 1878, the year it was painted.

At some point, another artist painted a frizzy red hairstyle (probably considered more up-to-date) on Kathleen Newton.

The painting was acquired by the Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio by the bequest of Noah L. Butkin in 1980.

 

The Dance of Death (1860)

The Dance of Death was exhibited at the Salon in 1861 under the title, Voie des fleurs, voie des pleurs (Path of Flowers, Way of Tears).  Tissot offered this to a collector at what he considered (or shrewdly pretended to consider) a low price of 5,000 francs.  In a private collection in Philadelphia until it was purchased from Julius H. Weitzner (1896 – 1986), a leading dealer in Old Master paintings in New York and London, by the Rhode Island School of Design Museum in Providence in 1954, it measures 14 5/8 by 48 3/16 by 1 1/2 in., or 37.1 by 122.4 by 3.8 cm.

IMG_4440 (2)

 

The Women of the Chariots

Women of Paris:  The Women of the Chariots (also called The Circus, 1883-1885)

The Women of the Chariots, also called The Circus, was exhibited in Paris in 1885 and in London in 1886 as Ladies of the Cars.

It is the second in the “La Femme à Paris” (“Women of Paris”) series, painted sometime before mid-1884.

The Women of the Chariots [57 ½ by 39 5/8”/146 by 100.65 cm], was sold by Julius Weitzner to Walter Lowry, who gifted it to the Rhode Island School of Design Museum in Providence, in 1958.

 

The Two Friends (c. 1881) and Interior of the Louvre (c. 1883-85).

In the collection of the Rhode Island School of Design Museum in Providence, but not on public display, are Tissot’s The Two Friends and In the Louvre.

Women of Paris:  The Circus Lover (1885)

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover is another painting in Tissot’s La Femme à Paris” series.

The year it was painted, 1885, it was exhibited from April 19 – June 15 as part of the series of fifteen canvases at Galerie Sedelmeyer, Paris, and in 1886, it was included with the series exhibited at Arthur Tooth and Son, London.

By 1889, The Circus Lover was in the possession of E. Simon, who sold it on March 30, 1889 at Christie’s, London, to Mr. King.  It later was with the Goupil Gallery, London; there is a label on the reverse of the stretcher from William Marchant and Co., The Goupil Gallery, London.  The painting next belonged to The Hon. Mrs. Arthur Henniker (Inger Margueretta Hutchinson) (d. 1923), Suffolk, England.  By 1955, it was in the possession of Gerald M. Fitzgerald, London, who lent the painting to the Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, that May for “James Tissot (1836-1902): An Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings, and Etchings.”  Mr. Fitzgerald sold The Circus Lover on July 26, 1957 at Christie’s, London, to Mr. Lloyd, director of Marlborough Fine Art, Ltd., London, for $ 3,219 USD/£ 1,150 GBP, and on February 13, 1958, Marlborough Fine Art sold the to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts for $ 5,000 as Amateur Circus.

The Emigrants (1873)

IMG_3640From information I have pieced together from various Tissot scholars, there were two versions of The Emigrants (1873), and Tissot exhibited either the original or the replica at the Grosvenor Gallery in 1879.

The original was a large oil on canvas, measuring 28 by 40 in./71.12 by 101.6 cm.  This painting was once in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, but was somehow damaged and cut down in height.  It is considered lost.

It is now known only through the replica that Tissot produced.  This smaller painting, an oil on panel also called The Emigrants (1873), measures 15.75 by 7.5 in./40.2 by 19 cm).  As of at least 1984, it was in a private collection in New York.  However, in 1991, it was gifted to the Speed Museum by Mr. and Mrs. W. Armin Willig.  [Winston] Armin Willig (1912 – 1992) was an alumnus of the University of Louisville, and he became a prominent businessman in the area.  He was appointed by the Governor of Kentucky to the post of Jefferson County judge after the incumbent County judge was killed in an automobile accident, serving from September 29, 1969 until January 4, 1970.

At the Falcon Inn, Waiting for the Ferry (1874)

At the Falcon Inn (Waiting for the Ferry

According to my research, Tissot’s Waiting for the Ferry at the Falcon Tavern (1874) was exhibited at Nottingham Castle, and at Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1887.  It then was in the collection of James Hall, Esq., a prominent collector of Pre-Raphaelite art, in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.  It was passed on to his son, Dr. Wilfred Hall, of Newcastle.  His daughter, Mrs. Edward Reeves of Winchester in Hampshire, sold the painting at Christie’s, London in 1954 to the John Nicholson Gallery, New York for $ 4,339 (£ 1550).

In 1955, Mrs. Blakemore Wheeler [1887 – 1964, née Minnie Norton Marvin] of Louisville, Kentucky, who had been on the board of the Speed Museum since 1939, began collecting art.  The daughter of a wealthy Louisville physician on the faculty of the University of Louisville Medical School and the wife of a prominent Realtor, she had no children.  By 1957, she owned this version of Tissot’s Waiting for the Ferry at the Falcon Tavern, and in 1963, she gifted it to the Speed.

Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1867)

Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1867), by James Tissot. 27 by 15 in. (68.58 by 38.10 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Lucy Paquette.

Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1867), by James Tissot. 27 by 15 in. (68.58 by 38.10 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Lucy Paquette.

In 1867, James Tissot painted Portrait of Eugène Coppens de Fontenay (1824 –1896), the president of the exclusive Jockey Club in Paris.  Married in 1853, Eugène Aimé Nicolas Coppens de Fontenay had three children.

His daughter, Marthe Jeanne-Marie (1854 – 1898) , married Henri, Comte de Meffray [Henri Meffray de Césargues (1846-1927)] in 1876; the couple had two children and at least three grandchildren.  Eugène’s second daughter, Françoise, was born in 1855, but there is no further information on her.

His son, Robert Coppens de Fontenay (1858 – 1925), became a diplomat with the Belgian legation.  He married in 1899 and had a son, Jacques Coppens de Fontenay (c. 1900- 1991), who sold the portrait at Christie’s, London, on March 5, 1971 to Holstein for $ 4,352 USD/£ 1,800 GBP.  The picture was with the Herman Shickman Gallery, New York, by October 1971 and was purchased by the City of Philadelphia with the W. P. Wilstach Fund on March 14, 1972.

CIN408385Young Women Looking at Japanese Articles (1869)

In 1869, Tissot assimilated his expanding collection of Japanese art and objets into elegant compositions in three similar paintings featuring young women looking at Japanese objects. 

By the 1930s, the version below was hanging in an interior decorator’s store on Third Street in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was purchased by Dr. Henry M. Goodyear; he and his wife gifted Tissot’s picture to the Cincinnati Art Museum in 1984.

 

Tea

Tea (1872)

Tea (1872) [oil on wood, 26 by 18 7/8 in./66 by 47.9 cm] was in a private collection in Rome, Italy in 1968.

It was with Somerville & Simpson, Ltd., London, by 1979-81, when it was consigned to Mathiessen Fine Art Ltd., London.

It was purchased from Mathiessen by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, New York.  Upon Mr. Wrightsman’s death in 1986, Mrs. Wrightsman owned it until 1998, when she gifted it to the Met.

 

Spring MorningSpring Morning (c. 1875)

Spring Morning (c. 1875) [oil on canvas, 22 by 16 3/4 in./55.9 by 42.5 cm] was in the possession of Thomas McLean, London, until about 1901; at some point after that, it was with Goupil, London.

It was sold by Sotheby’s Belgravia, London, on March 23, 1981, as Matinée de printemps, for £40,000 to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, New York.  Mrs. Wrightsman gifted it to the Met in 2009.

In Full Sunlight (En plein soleil, c. 1881)

In Full Sunshine

In Full Sunlight (En plein soleil, c. 1881) [oil on wood, 9 3/4 by 13 7/8 in./24.8 by 35.2 cm] was with Lenz Fine Arts, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, until 1976, when it was sold to Williams and Son, London.  That firm sold to the painting to Stair Sainty Gallery, London, where it was purchased in 1976 by Victor Hervey, 6th Marquess of Bristol (1915 – 1985), London.  In 1983, the Marquess sold it back to Stair Sainty, where it was purchased that year by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, New York.

Mrs. Charles Wrightsman kept the picture until 2006, when she gifted it to the Met.

If you have questions about any of these Tissot paintings, please contact the participating museum.

Related posts:

Tissot in the U.S.:  The West

Tissot in the U.S.: The Midwest

Tissot in the U.S.: The Speed Museum, Kentucky

Tissot in the U.S.: The Mid-Atlantic

Tissot in the U.S.:  New York

Tissot in the U.S.:  New England

© 2016 by Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

CH377762The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).    See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.

Happy Hour with James Tissot

photo 3Since today is April Fool’s Day – and my birthday – pour a glass of something cheerful, and let’s celebrate together by admiring James Tissot’s most joyful images. 

Tissot’s paintings are notable for their psychological ambiguity or tension – moodiness, quarrels, shady situations, vulgarity, frustration, even anger.

But a handful portray sheer happiness, and we all need a dose of that, especially in the uneven weather of spring!

La partie carrée (The Foursome, 1870), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 47 by 57 in. (119.5 by 144.5 cm). Private Collection. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

In Partie Carée – exhibited at the 1870 Salon, the cautious, business-minded Tissot was at his most devil-may-care.  These convivial friends are certainly delighted to spend time together at their leisurely, riverside Happy Hour!

A Bunch of Lilacs (c. 1875), James TIssot. Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in "The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot," by Lucy Paquette, © 2012

The Bunch of Lilacs (c. 1875), James TIssot. Image: 21 by 15 in. (53.34 by 38.10 cm). Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library for use in “The Hammock: A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot,” by Lucy Paquette, © 2012

One of the most lovely images Tissot ever created, The Bunch of Lilacs (c. 1875) is set in the new conservatory in Tissot’s St. John’s Wood house at 17 (now 44) Grove End Road.  The peace, profusion and prosperity in this painting just make me smile: this woman doesn’t seem to have a care in the world as she waltzes over the gleaming floor.  Can’t you just hear her humming some pretty tune?

A Fête Day at Brighton (c. 1875-1878), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 34 by 21 in. (86.36 by 53.34 cm). (Photo: Wikimedia.org)

You can’t help but feel part of A Fête Day at Brighton:  it’s a street party at a seaside resort, and you can feel the uneven pavement under your feet, the sun on your face, and the exhilarating breeze in your hair.

Holyday (c. 1876), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 30 by 39 1/8 in. (76.5 by 99.5 cm.). Tate Britain. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

Tissot painted members of the famous I Zingari cricket club (which still exists, and is one of the oldest amateur cricket clubs) in their distinctive black, red and gold caps in his garden at 17 Grove End Road, St. John’s Wood, which was only a few hundred yards from Lord’s cricket ground.  Holyday was exhibited at the Grosvenor Gallery in London from May to June, 1877.  Oscar Wilde, then a 23-year-old student at Magdalen College, Oxford, reviewed the Grosvenor’s exhibition in Dublin University Magazine that summer, skewering the subject matter of Holyday as “Mr. Tissot’s over-dressed, common-looking people, and ugly, painfully accurate representation of modern soda water bottles.”   No doubt Oscar would find me quite common, since I find this image entirely merry!  I want to join this lively group for a cup of tea and a slice of cake.  Holyday is on display at Tate Britain in room 1840; click here for an interactive look at it.

October (1877), by James Tissot. 85 by 42.8 in. (216 by 108.7 cm). Musée des Beaux-Arts de Montréal. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

October (1877) depicts Tissot’s mistress and muse, Kathleen Newton (1854–1882) in the full bloom of beauty at age 23, glowing amid the fall foliage.  I saw this when I was in Montreal, and you can almost hear Mrs. Newton’s petticoats rustling over her kitten heels.  Tissot presents her youthful charm in such a surprisingly intimate close-up composition for a monumental painting – over 7 feet tall and 3 ½ feet wide – that it overwhelms the viewer with a sense of vitality.

In an English Garden, by James Tissot. Private Collection. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

Tissot’s garden, the setting for In an English Garden, was designed with a blend of English-style flower beds as well as plantings familiar to him from French parks.  Gravel paths led to kitchen gardens and greenhouses for flowers, fruit and vegetables.  This painting shows Tissot’s ornamental pond from a different viewpoint than Holyday.  It portrays a gorgeous day in a gorgeous garden, the figures enjoying blissful privacy and serenity.

Le Petit Nemrod (A Little Nimrod), c. 1882, by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 34 ½ by 55 3/5 in. (110.5 by 141.3 cm). Musée des Beaux-Arts et d’archéologie, Besançon, France. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

Le Petit Nemrod (A Little Nimrod, c. 1882) depicts cousins, the children of Mrs. Newton and her sister Polly Hervey, playing together in a London park.  (Nimrod, according to the Book of Genesis, was a great-grandson of Noah, and he is depicted in the Hebrew Bible as a mighty hunter.)  Can’t you hear these kids giggling and shrieking?

Sur La Tamise/On the Thames (The Return from Henley, c. 1884-85). Oil on canvas, 57.48 by 40.04 in. (146 by 101.7 cm). Private Collection. (Photo: http://www.the-athenaeum.org)

Sur La Tamise/On the Thames (The Return from Henley, c. 1884-85) is a flight of fancy radiating girlish euphoria.  That this tightly-swaddled creature managed to seat herself in this skiff, and to stand upright again, is explicable only by one word:  magic.

Le banc de jardin/The Garden Bench (1882), by James Tissot. Oil on canvas, 99.1 by 142.2 cm. Private collection. (Photo: Wikiart.org)

Le banc de jardin/The Garden Bench (c. 1882) was a favorite image of Tissot’s; he kept it all his life.  Pictured are Kathleen Newton, her daughter Violet, her son Cecil George, and a second girl who could be her niece Lilian Hervey or her niece Belle (behind the bench).  Sheer maternal joy.

IMG_5303 (2)So – a toast to lovers of James Tissot around the world:  Cheers, my dears!

Previous April Fool’s Day posts:

The Missing Tissot Nudes

Was James Tissot a Plagiarist?

Tissot and his Friends Clown Around

© 2016 Lucy Paquette.  All rights reserved.

 

CH377762If you do not have a Kindle e-reader, you may download free Kindle reading apps for PCs, Smartphones, tablets, and the Kindle Cloud Reader to read The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot.  Read reviews.

The Hammock:  A novel based on the true story of French painter James Tissot, brings Tissot’s world from 1870 to 1879 alive in a story of war, art, Society glamour, love, scandal, and tragedy.

Illustrated with 17 stunning, high-resolution fine art images in full color

Courtesy of The Bridgeman Art Library  

(295 pages; ISBN (ePub):  978-0-615-68267-9).  See http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009P5RYVE.